Mixing Maestro Asbjoern Andersen


In this interview, re-recording mixers Tom Ozanich and Dean Zupancic discuss the mix of Bradley Cooper's film Maestro – currently in the running for a 'Best Sound' Oscar (among other noms!) They talk about mixing the Ely Cathedral scene and the party scenes, mixing effects in a musical way during scenes without score, and so much more!
Interview by Jennifer Walden, photos courtesy of Netflix
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Hear the interview with Tom Ozanich and Dean Zupancic here:

 

Hear the interview in the brand new A Sound Effect podcast episode here:


Sound libraries highlighted in this episode:

  • Creature Sound Effects Alien Life Play Track 4710 sounds included From: $129

    EXPAND YOUR SONIC UNIVERSE AND CRAFT UNRIVALED ALIEN SOUND EFFECTS
    Explore the unknown corners of the universe and discover ALIEN LIFE! Feel the tension as visceral snarls, shrieks, squawks, grunts, and groans craft the unsettling sounds of extraterrestrial biology. ALIEN LIFE features our signature high-quality audio and design. It provides you the tools to develop unique vocalizations and bioacoustics for all sentient beings in your universe. Use these high-quality animal sounds and prop effects creatively to craft the sounds of extraterrestrial orifices and appendages. This collection offers organic and exotic sonic palettes, weaving a vivid tapestry of alien evolution into a single guttural bellow.

    ALIEN LIFE | Sound Effects | Trailer

    EXOTIC SIGNATURE VOCALIZATIONS

    This sound collection contains a vast range of pristinely recorded animal vocalizations. It focuses on exotic signature sounds, typically more challenging to capture cleanly. Curated to provide the tools to design truly unique and convincing zoological vocalizations for any creature you can fathom

    VERY BROAD SOUND PALETTE

    It includes a variety of fresh yet unmistakable snorts, growls, screeches, screams, chirps, and more. These sounds come in varying states of excitement and agitation, providing limitless potential. Discover strange new combinations and experiment with timing and tonality. Craft audible cues that help define the anatomy and biology of your ETs.

    EXPRESSIVE PROP EFFECTS

    Additionally, the collection includes a curated assortment of expressive prop effects. These effects cover clicking, slimy, squishy, scratchy, crunchy, and more. They round out the collection and offer more tools for boundless sound design potential. Invade your universe with ALIEN LIFE and manifest unique zoological vocalizations for all of the other-worldly creatures you can imagine!


    INCLUDED SOUNDS – KEYWORDS
    ALIEN, EXTRATERRESTRIAL, VISCERAL, GRUNT, SNARL, GROAN, SCREAM, SQUEAL, SHRIEK, BRAY, BELLOW, CAW, HISS, CROAK, SNORT, CHIRP, GROWL
  • Animal Sound Effects Ambisonic Horse Carriage Play Track 22 sounds included, 26 mins total $39

    This classic vehicle is drawn by two horses and produces mostly clank and rattle of wood and metal. You can also hear some leather creaks and the horses’ hooves and breaths. Occasionally the driver beatboxes some cues – clucking, smacking, monosyllables.

    Some of the files contain solely the rattle of the rolling carriage but no horses – these can be used for sound designing any old vehicle on a bumpy road.

    This selection of onboard sounds contains a variety of speeds, horse gaits and road surfaces. They have been recorded with the Sennheiser Ambeo VR Mic, and, simultaneously, with two stereo sets. For each recording you get 10 channels:

    – ambiX B-format (4 channels)
    – Stereo XY (Audio-Technica BP4025)
    – Wide Stereo (DPA 4060) captured at the carriage’s chassis
    – Stereo Mix of all of the above

    The ambiX B-format files are ready to be encoded into all spatial sound setups: like 5.1, 7.1, 4.0, VR 360 degree experience, and more.

    The library is UCS compliant.

  • 54 sounds on fire! Another indispensable toolkit of fire, wood burning, flames and different fire ambiences that were recorded indoors and outdoors. Find the true sound of it with Vadi Sound Library.

     

     

    About Campfire, Fireplace and Stove

    From loopable fire, wood burning, fireplace and flames, bonfire, stove and campfire, this 96 kHz – 24bit collection has both organic Foley and sound design usability in stereo and mono format.

    You will get lots of organic firewood crackles, sizzles, hisses, whooshes and campfire ambiences of the forest, sometimes with owls hooting, dogs barking and the crickets. Fire bursts and igniting with spray and flamethrower, matches, magneto lighters, closing and opening of metal lids are included too.

    These 54 immersive sounds are windy, wild, fast or calm and peaceful and were recorded at different seasons, at night and day, indoors and outdoors and all fire burning sounds are loopable. You will get intuitive, detailed naming, UCS compatibility and the usual Vadi Sound craft and attention to detail.

    Keywords:

    Fire, fireplace, stove, campfire, bonfire, flame, burn, burst, crackle, sizzle, hiss, gas, ignite, forest, night, day, indoor, outdoor, match, lighter, whoosh, air, brush, debris.

     

     

    What else you may need

    You may want to check out Drag and Slide Pack for 477 sounds of dragging, sliding, scraping and friction sounds of different objects made of wood, plastic, metal on various surfaces.

    Lots Of Chains is another option with 450+ sounds that capture pretty much every material and action of the chain.

  • Bundles General Hospital Play Track 2000 sounds included, 900 mins total $249

    HAL has teamed up with sound designer Raphael Sohier to create the most comprehensive hospital sound effects library to date. General Hospital has 760 files and over 2000 sounds covering all aspects of the genre.

    This collection is the result of years of work and aims to set a new standard for a genre mostly neglected by independent sound libraries until now. Even old tropes need new sound ideas (no pun intended) and we think we have achieved exactly this with our library.

    HAL General Hospital | Trailer

    This is an All-in-One SFX library where you will find :

    Ambiences – Whether it is a busy corridor, a bursting waiting area or the strange calm of an ICU bedroom with all its machines, you will find it in here. We have recorded in various hospitals located in France – discernible speech was edited out so the recordings could cover a broader use.

    Medical Equipment – From the syncopated hissy sound of a ventilator to the disruptive power of a MRI machine or the strange hollow resonances of an hyperbaric chamber, we’ve recorded a large number of medical devices with multiple perspectives.

    Activities – What would be of a medical drama without the sound of hasty fooststeps down the hallway or of a gurney descending abruptly out of an ambulance ? Typical activities such as these were recorded on real locations for this collection.

    Foley – We have welcomed veteran foley artist Gilles Marsalet in order to cover some specifics such as surgical instruments and operating table gore which, to say the least, demands a certain finesse – the same delicacy that separates doctors from flesh-eating zombies.

    Sirens – Wailing, whoppers, piercers, buzzers, dual-tone…we’ve got them all. Getting in and out of a hospital in style is guaranteed.

    Beeps – These are perhaps the most iconic sounds related to this kind of environment. Our collection has beeps in all waveshapes and colors, recorded from real devices in pristine condition and designed for even more flexibility. Whether you are looking for realism or  you just want to enhance the drama, General Hospital has got you covered.

    Hospitals are often depicted in fiction because they are places inherently rich in conflict and human drama. They are the ideal setting for stories about struggle, sacrifice, strengthening of bonds, loss… As sound designers we try to enhance these feelings through the creation of dynamics and subtle sonic variations. General Hospital was crafted with this in mind and it offers a broad palette of sounds in order to give you as many options as possible while working on a scene.

  • Animal Sound Effects Imaginary Birds Play Track 2000+ sounds included, 64 mins total $69

    Recorded using only bird calls, musical instruments, voice and whistling techniques, IMAGINARY BIRDS contains over 200 different organic and realistic songs of non-existing birds. Recorded with a Sennheiser MKH 8050 with ultrasonic content, you can use the sounds as is, pitch-shift them or combine individual sounds to create new bird songs.

    KEY FEATURES:

    • 227 sounds recorded with MKH 8050
    • 96KHz/24bit
    • Each file contains several variations of the songs
    • Recorded dry, no reverb added
    • Ideal for cartoon, sci-fi, adventure films, video games, creature design, soundscapes…

Want to read the interview instead? Get it below:

Bradley Cooper’s Maestro is in the running for a 2024 ‘Best Sound’ Oscar. Last week, A Sound Effect talked about the sound editing on the film with Richard King and Jason Ruder. This week, re-recording mixers Tom Ozanich and Dean Zupancic – at Warner Bros. Post Production Creative Services in Burbank – talk about how they shaped the film’s mix.

In addition to Maestro, Ozanich and Zupancic have another shot at the 2024 ‘Best Sound’ Oscar – for their mix on The Creator directed by Gareth Edwards. (Check out our interview with The Creator supervising sound editor/sound designer Erik Aadahl.)

Cooper’s Maestro is a reunion of sorts for Ozanich, Zupancic, and Ruder – all three had worked with Cooper on A Star is Born, which also featured music recorded live on-set.

Here, Ozanich (who mixed music and dialogue) talks about carefully creating the right space for the live performances using different reverbs to change perspectives to match what we hear to what we see. He and Zupancic discuss their combined approach to mixing the party crowds. And Zupancic talks about mixing foley to match different eras in the film, mixing the effects as a way to score specific scenes, like Leonard and Felicia’s argument during the Thanksgiving day parade in NYC, and much more.



Maestro | Ely Cathedral | Official Clip | Netflix


Maestro | Ely Cathedral | Official Clip | Netflix

I had the opportunity to talk with Richard King and Jason Ruder about the sound editing on Maestro and one thing we talked about was recording the music live on set. I’d love to hear about your approach to mixing those music scenes, particularly Ely Cathedral…

Tom Ozanich (TO): So you heard from Jason about the live setup – basically, Jason hired a company to come in and they mic’d it all up and recorded it live. As they’re laying it down, they do a balance of the elements and lay it out into a whole bunch of 5.1 stems. Because it’s live and it’s all in this one big cavernous room, there’s tons of bleed of all of the elements onto the other elements. But, I think I had 20 5.1 stems. There were mics focused over the strings, over the brass, over the choir, and in some cases, there might be a couple of sets for the choir and then you have the two soloists. What I end up with are 20 or so 5.1 stems and then I try to fit that into the movie and the story that’s unfolding there.

Because it’s live and it’s all in this one big cavernous room, there’s tons of bleed of all of the elements onto the other elements.

There’s a big oner master shot where the camera comes over the orchestra and goes right up to Lenny and then eventually comes back and lands over Felicia’s shoulder. As we did that movement, I wanted things to feel like they were in the space in the real location – that they were relative to what we’re seeing. That would not be set in what they captured because they’re just capturing it in a static setting and obviously, there’s movement to all of that. We also wanted to let you focus on a couple of the elements as the camera goes by, like the choir in the beginning. The male choir has a big part that jumps out. Prior to that, they’re behind us and then they’re in front of us. So I’m trying to do really stealth moves where things just appear in the right place. In a case like that, I’m pushing the dynamics of that to get more out of it so things appear in the place we’re expecting to hear them based on what we’re seeing.

For example, at one point the timpani player is doing a roll and so there’s just a subtle move there to focus you on noticing what he’s playing right there. And that happens with different people, different players, but it’s never a solo thing or a featured thing where it pops way out of the mix. It’s just subtleties to make you dial into that and notice it without noticing that there was any change.

 



Maestro: Sound Breakdown | Netflix


Maestro: Sound Breakdown | Netflix

That must’ve been tough given that, as you said, there’s bleed on the tracks. So the mics are stationary and the instruments aren’t isolated. So as the camera swings around, now you have to adjust the mix to that new visual perspective using a fixed recording…

TO: Yeah, sometimes the brass may have a bunch of strings on it that, when you go move the strings, they don’t want to move because there’s enough of them in other mics. So there is a bit of that. But again, it’s not intended to be a drastic move that you are aware of.

Dean Zupancic (DZ): But your brain registers where you’re flying over, which is great.

TO: I always think of sound as a focus-pulling device – amongst other things. So it can really cause you to notice things in the frame. By doing little shifts like that and highlighting something subtly, you’re thinking about it or you’re aware of that thing without us being heavy-handed, telling you to think about it.

 



The Sound of Maestro | In Conversation | Netflix


The Sound of Maestro | In Conversation | Netflix

What about some of the more intimate performances, like Leonard’s piano duo with Aaron Copland? In my chat with Richard and Jason, we talked about a ‘better’ version of the performance being edited to picture there. From a mix perspective, what did it take to make that work, so that you believe that what you’re hearing is what you’re also seeing?

TO: I think it’s a matter of putting it in the space in such a believable way that you don’t question it. It just feels real; if it feels real, you’ll buy it. You’ll just sign off and you’ll disengage the part of your brain that’s questioning whether or not they’re really playing it or whatever.

… it’s a matter of putting it in the space in such a believable way that you don’t question it.

In that particular scene, you’re watching them play it. And so you do think about that. But the piano is not played just in front of us, straight up in a stereo manner. It’s pushed a little bit off to the right because the piano itself is sitting off to the right in the frame. And then it’s played in that room, and so there’s room on it. Those are all clues to tell you that thing is physically sitting right there, and I’m looking through this window at the scene.

I don’t think that’s a very tricky, big, difficult thing, but this whole mix is really about elegance and nuance and a thousand different little subtle things that make it feel tangible and real and just flow together.

I don’t think there’s any point in the mix where you question the reality of any scene.

DZ: I don’t think there’s any point in the mix where you question the reality of any scene. Honestly, from the guy sitting next to Tom, I believe all the space. I know what he’s doing, but I believe the rooms, the reverb (i.e., the room that he puts on that piano in that particular scene fits that room).
So you don’t question it. It doesn’t sound fake. And none of the reverbs or rooms to me in this movie sound manufactured.

TO: A great example is the very beginning of the movie; the piano is playing and it comes up over the logo so we have no context of reality tied to a picture because there’s no picture yet.

But as soon as we cut to the picture of Lenny sitting there playing the piano in the opening of the movie, all of a sudden, the piano focuses and plays like it’s sitting right there in that room. Prior to that moment, it’s played in a more typical, score-y abstract way.

 

How did you make it feel less abstract and more real for when we transition into actually seeing him playing the piano?

TO: Everything about it changes. It positionally changes, it changes in space, in the room, reverb, and a little bit of an EQ shift.

And then the other factor is that some of the sounds of the room start to come in there, too. There are a couple of places where something like that happens in the movie and it’s shifting to a believable, viable, real space.

Behind the Masterful Sound and Music Editing on ‘Maestro’ – with Richard King and Jason Ruder:

 

Hear the interview in this A Sound Effect podcast episode:


Sound libraries highlighted in this episode:

  • If you are looking for a high-quality sound library for your trailer projects, you have come to the right place. Introducing our Trailer Sound Library, a collection of 520 carefully designed sounds that will make your trailers stand out from the crowd.

    We put a lot of time and effort into creating this sound library, and we are confident that you will love it. Every sound in this library is hand-picked, meticulously crafted, and professionally mixed. These are not raw sounds, but polished and refined sounds that will suit any trailer genre and mood.

    Our Trailer Sound Library covers a wide range of sounds, such as:

    – Impacts and hits: powerful and punchy sounds that will add impact and drama to your trailers.

    – Risers and whooshes: dynamic and suspenseful sounds that will create tension and anticipation in your trailers.

    – Processed impacts and fx: creative and unique sounds that will add flair and style to your trailers.

    – Texture and particle: atmospheric and immersive sounds that will create a rich and realistic sound environment for your trailers.

    – String ensemble effects and music: emotional and expressive sounds that will add depth and emotion to your trailers.

    And much more!

    One of the best features of our Trailer Sound Library is that it is versatile and adaptable. Whether you are working on a modern blockbuster or a classic trailer, our sound library has something for you. We have created two versions of our sound library: Core and processed. Core contains the traditional and classic sounds that are suitable for any trailer project. processed contains the modern and innovative sounds that are ideal for contemporary and futuristic trailers. You can use either version separately, or mix and match them to create your own custom trailer sounds.

    Don’t miss this opportunity to get your hands on this amazing sound library, and take your trailer projects to the next level. Order now and get instant access to the download link. You will be amazed by the results!

  • Kawaii UI Trailer
  • Neighbors: Sounds Behind Walls is a unique collection, offering over 3 hours of sounds capturing the daily activities of neighbors living next or above you. This collection can be used especially to bring life to quiet spaces/rooms.

    Think about indistinct sounds from neighbors walking around, setting the table, making coffee, tea, load and unload the dishwasher, cooking, tidying up the room, flushing the toilet, using the water tap, vacuum cleaning, dry blowing their hair, brushing their teeth, taking something out of the fridge or freezer, opening and closing curtains, or even practicing an instrument. And that is not all. We’ve also covered a “noisy” neighbor walking around the room, using or slamming doors, jumping, moving furniture and walking up and down the stairs.

    All recordings are clear and completely free from external noise, voices and other disruptions. No additional reverb is used for more flexibility.

    Utilizing two microphone setups provides two variations for each recording, offering both more pronounced and more distant options.

    Get over 3 hours of unique, royalty-free and high-quality recordings with this library. Recorded in 24 bit / 96 kHz. Accurately edited and mastered. For more detailed descriptions about the recordings in this collection see the metadata in our file lists or listen to the preview montage.

    This library is UCS compliant (universalcategorysystem.com). In this new category system, all files contain extensive metadata like file description, Category & Subcategory. Metadata can be read and processed by the most common audio libraries management tools.

  • Vintage Mechanical Keyboards: a meticulously crafted sound effects library capturing the nostalgic charm character of seven unique-sounding mechanical keyboards: the much-loved IBM Model M, the sleek IBM Japan 5576, the classic Wyse PSE, a unique Soviet Elektronika MC 7004, a quirky non-qwerty Stocktrader keyboard from 1978, a solid Zinc bank teller keyboard, and a vintage terminal board from 1976.

    Each keyboard was expertly recorded with multiple microphones to preserve its unique sonic character, featuring regular keystrokes at various velocities, slow press/release strikes, and separate recordings of letter keys, arrow keys, numpads, and spacebars. There’s also typing at various speeds, keyboard mashing, finger rolls, and miscellaneous switches and plastic creaks.

    950 meticulously crafted files, totaling 25.4 GB, and recorded at 192kHz and 24-bit, complete with metadata that adheres to the UCS standard.

    🚀🦢

  • This library contains 7 steam locomotive whistles from the beginning of the last century!

    These huge monsters could still announce themselves very loudly!

    • Each recording is several repetitions of long and short whistles for each steam locomotive, recorded at close range.
    • The file name also includes the models of the locomotives, as each one’s whistle is unique!

Like when Lenny plays “Here Comes the Bride” and he’s actually in a different room playing the piano and you hear it coming out of that room into this room. Again, you just believe that he’s sitting there and playing that…

TO: Right, and it’s doing a similar thing where when it starts playing it’s like where is that coming from? We’re with Felicia where it’s like, “Oh what, wait, what’s going on?” And then we reverse and look at him playing and boom, the piano is attached to the piano. So it feels like it’s right there.

 

Were there any particularly helpful reverbs that you used? What helped these performances to feel real in the context of the scene?

TO: It’s all the standard tools that I use – mostly Audio Ease Altiverb and LiquidSonics reverbs like the Cinematic Rooms.

For Ely Cathedral, there’s so much room in the actual recording that is just what it is. There’s nothing added to that. At the end of the piece of music, when the orchestra stops and you hear this long tail out of reverb, that’s the actual Ely Cathedral. That’s what’s on mic.


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  • Cinematic & Trailer Sound Effects Abandoned Oil Tank Play Track 327 sounds included $50

    On a recording trip to the smaller Danish port town Struer, I came across an abandoned empty oil tank. Inside I found two giant wires attached to the floor and the ceiling of the tank, almost like a huge 2 stringed double bass. I’m telling you the reverb in there was longer than the Eiffel Tower on a cloudless day !

    On the outside this was just an empty abandoned building, but it turned out it was not empty at all because it was full of sound and a few dead birds. I’m glad I was curious enough to go inside for a closer investigation and not just pass by.

    After several hours of concentrated recording, it was nice to get my ears back out in dry air. I’m happy there are no open sends to Valhalla in real life but experiencing the eternal resonance on the low frequencies from the wires was absolutely amazing.

    Abandoned Oil Tank was recorded with a LOM basic Ucho stereo pair, a Zoom H6 and the LOM Geofon. All files are in 96 kHz/24 bit and contain the original recordings.

    The result is a unique sound effect library including balloon pop impulse responses from a truly unique location that very recently became even more unique since word says that the oil tank is no more and has abandoned this world.

    327 individual sounds – all tagged with Universal Category System (UCS) metadata.

    www.katrineamsler.com

  • The Rummage & Loot Sound Effects library contains 203 sound effects for looting and searching for items.

    Instances include:

    Search Backpack/Inventory
    Search through Drawers/Cupboards
    Search Trash/Rubbish Bins
    Search through Bushes/Foliage
    Search Toolbox/Metal Items
    Search Wallet/Coin Pile
    Search Corpses

    Other case uses include:

    Equip Clothing or Gear
    Inventory Sounds
    Item Collect/Pickup
    Handling various objects/items

    28 %
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  • Authentic Forest Footsteps 

    Explore a collection of genuine forest footsteps, recorded in various forests through different seasons. Our goal was to capture a wide range of textures, from the moisture-rich swampy forest to the distinct crunch of leaves in a dry, woodland setting.

    Each file is recorded using the Sennheiser MKH 8040 and Sound Devices mixers. Whether you’re working on a film, a game, or any multimedia project, these sound effects add a touch of realism to your audio landscape.

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  • Vehicle Sound Effects Ford F-150 Truck Play Track 85+ sounds included, 52 mins total $99

    Get the sounds of a Ford F-150 2013 truck, captured by Watson Wu. Metadata is included with over 52 minutes of combined recording time split into 85 ready to use wave files. There are onboard, external, and foley sounds, all in high quality 24 bit resolution, 96khz sample rate. This is the right library when you need truck sounds for your film, TV, or game projects. Note that are no interior cab recordings in this package.

    Onboard multi-track recordings are in 4 separate mono wave files. Drag & drop or import each of the files into your audio editing software, then align them for creative mixing. There are also stereo mix versions of the OnBoard recordings. The External recordings are in stereo wave files. The download is a 1.5gb compressed .rar file (3.45gb Uncompressed).

    Text here:

    Onboard Settings:
    Channel 1 = Engine, Channel 2 = Near Air Intake, Channel 3 = Exhaust 1, Channel 4 = Exhaust 2

    External Settings:
    Stereo in Left and Right Channels


Latest releases:

  • Royal Cannon is a mini sound library created by sound designer Barney Oram. It features recordings of a British royal cannon salute, fired by six WW1 field guns in February of 2020, to mark the 68th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. All sounds in the library are contained within one single 192kHz 24bit WAV file, with 23 individual takes contained within.

    These recordings were made using the Neumann 191, and have been decoded into a stereo file. The recordings have had some light cleanup but have been left mostly natural, with the sounds of the soldiers shouting and reloading the guns still audible.

    This library includes detailed SoundMiner metadata and utilizes the UCS system for ease of integration into your library.

    Behind the Scenes Video:


    Royal Cannon


  • Over 375 sounds of creaking materials, including breaking cables, ropes under tension and about to split, wires and strings under stress, metal friction causing tension. Recorded with a combination of Sanken CO100K and Nevaton microphones for full frequency sound content. Saved as 192KHz these files allow for high resolution editing. Useful for impact sounds in cinema, games or documentary, but also for cartoon sounds or even creature sounds as many of the recordings contain vowel-like screeching and scraping.

    Imagine a scene where a rope is about to break over an edge, an object being torn by a huge cable, a wooden structure about to collapse under stress and so on… Our brain is triggered by those rattling sounds or spine-breaking cracks coming from little fibers being split apart, parts of the structure creaking, wires scraping over edges…

    These sounds can be perceived as delicate but have a great psychological impact as we interpret these and know what is about to happen. So suspense is built with both background and close-up sounds. Useful when building tension, when creating a sense of upcoming climax, these sonic elements will work out to amplify the details that are often important but not always visible for the eye.

    All the source material and recording are acoustic, there are no digital effects applied. This guarantees natural organic harmonics, even way beyond our hearing. Pitching down the 192 KHz files will let you discover another collection of sounds!

     

  • This pack includes 13 magic sounds, including fireball, water, lightning, curse and healing spells. Elevate your game’s enchanting atmosphere instantly with this expertly crafted sound collection.

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  • Introducing “Presage – Boutique Horror Instrument,” our inaugural Kontakt Instrument designed to evoke spine-chilling terror and suspense. Featuring an array of meticulously crafted sounds including Dark Impacts, Slams, Attic Rumbles, Bowed Wood and Cymbals, Bells, Clock Ticks, Typewriter SFX, Drones and Atmospheres, Scrapes, Stingers, a Victrola Needle, and much more.

    Presage is a comprehensive toolkit for composers and sound designers seeking to immerse their audiences in a world of fear and unease. Every sound in this horror sample library is meticulously twisted and distorted, ensuring maximum impact in your compositions.

    The intuitive GUI boasts our signature “Trepid Knob,” a blend of compressors and transient designers that allows you to manipulate and distort sounds with ease. Additionally, our “Frenzy Knob” offers a choral effect tailored for maniacal delays of madness, while the “Fever Knob” adds saturation to further enhance the intensity of your creations. Unleash your creativity and unleash terror with Presage – your ultimate horror sound solution.

    Requires the full version of Kontakt 6.8.0 (or higher)

  • This is a remaster of our 1st library. Every sample has been reworked to punch harder and yet take less headroom. It now has 2243 unique sounds, 648 of these are brand new! That’s more than 2GB of content, running at 1:04:29.

    In this pack, you will find everything you need to create amazing Sci-fi impacts and whooshes. You have access to complex cinematic sounds, sources and FX to create your own unique stuff, a special folder of sub and transient heavy sounds to add oomph and punch to any sound, as well the star of the show: the Designed Weapons.
    Whether you are looking for a laser sword or an electric hammer, you will quickly find something ready to use in this pack. We have included 20 predesigned weapons complete with whooshes, hits and blocks variations. The 3 new weapons included also have more variations and some extra goodies such as parries or positive and negative blocks.

    Everything is in 24bit 96khz and uses the UCS naming convention.

    Have fun! :)

    AUDIO SUMMONERS

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That’s fantastic. What a beautiful-sounding space. And what about the singing in the film? There’s that scene near the beginning. It’s a party scene, and a man and a woman are singing together. Was that a pre-record or was that also recorded live on set?

TO: That’s live also. That’s just production, like as if they were talking.

That was tricky in that they’re both singing there and they’re bleeding onto each other’s mics. There’s a bit of a challenge to contain some of the peaky parts and yet let it feel like it’s naturally breathing. There are a few spots in there where they’re peaky and edgy and it would hurt if they’re not contained.

That was tricky in that they’re both singing there and they’re bleeding onto each other’s mics.

There are a few places where somebody turns their head and they really go off mic. Trying to find ways to feel that shift, but not as dramatically. What gets recorded is way too dramatic. If they go way off-mic, then you’re going, “What happened?”

That’s sometimes a matter of having to lean on another mic that’s either the other person or another mic in the room to pick that up or process it and gain it up to be at the right level and not be overly roomy.

 



Maestro: Crafting the Sound | Netflix


Maestro: Crafting the Sound | Netflix

Speaking of dialogue bleed, Dean, in my conversation with Richard King he talked about how they got those great crowd sounds for the parties. That, in fact, Bradley Cooper staged a party on set and Steven Morrow miked up all guests. So you had all these discrete channels of the partygoers’ conversations and you could peek in and out of them to follow the camera through the room. Can you talk about mixing those crowds?

DZ: Tom handled all the on-camera and the group ADR – all the on-camera dialogue that you hear – because Tom did dialogue and music.
It was part of Richard’s domain because of dialogue editing by Richard’s dialogue editor, Tony Martinez.

Lenny’s room is always busy and alive, and Felicia’s room is more subdued.

Our part, sound effects-wise, was crowd effects – party crowds that we circled around and used to fill out the space to help dialogue and/or group ADR not to feel like group ADR/party ADR.

It was a combo. But as far as all the on-camera microphones, that’s Tom’s department. It all starts with dialogue.

TO: We usually establish what is our focus, which is generally the principal actors. I’ll go through and try to shape that and get that to read properly.

… it’s a matter of trying to keep it real sounding.

Then we start building the rest of the world around it. In the case of the party scenes like that, there are production crowds but the trick with that is that a lot of it has bleed of the principal actors on it. And so it’s a matter of a bob and weave to make sure you can use pieces of that. Some of it’s clean because people are far enough away, but if they’re close to the principles, then sometimes I can’t use that because it’s going to have the principal actors and they’ll be off-mic and roomy and not really helping. So then we’ll add in the group and all of the effects crowds around that.

And it’s a matter of trying to keep it real sounding. And with the group, it’s potentially the least believable part of it if it’s not done properly. So the effects crowds help to create a world and a bed for all that to sit in. And then the group can give you some depth. So we have people that are closer to us and people that are further away from us and it can play against each other.

Again, it’s just a matter of us sitting there, combing through it multiple times to decide the proper ebb and flow of all that.

DZ: And each room of that party, in particular, has a different feel, which was orchestrated. Lenny’s room is always busy and alive, and Felicia’s room is more subdued.

 

What about the foley sounds for those party scenes? Was that challenging to mix in because the crowd was so lively?

DZ: Yeah, well, foley’s tricky in its own right because if it’s not performed by the artist properly, and if the sounds aren’t true, it’s hard to mix them in. Then again, if the sounds are good, and the foley was performed great, it’s a delicate balance to mix it into the scene. If it’s underplayed, you can’t hear it, but if it’s overplayed, it sounds like foley. That takes you out of the scene.

You don’t know what’s foley and what’s really production.

We had great foley on this show. Foley and group ADR kind of work hand in hand. You’ve got to use it and mix it against the dialogue and mix it properly to sit in there to make everything believable. And in that particular scene, I love the foley because all the movement and the footsteps and all that you would hear in a party fits so well into that scene that you believe it. You don’t know what’s foley and what’s really production.

 

Were there a lot of foley tracks to cover all of that? Because, gosh, there are so many people and they have drinks and they’re all moving around…

DZ: It was probably pretty average for a feature. The foley wasn’t super wide. In general, foley can tend to get wide. This movie was a challenge in a way because the whole movie was a 100% foley, like all movies.

We did three temps on this movie. During the first temp, we had to stay true to the era, through 50 years. Foley was used back in 1943, but it was used differently in 1943 than it is in 2023. So we had to be very careful not to overplay scenes in ’43 and in the ’50s, in order to make the illusion that we’re actually watching a movie from 1943 in the black and white sections.

…we had to stay true to the era, through 50 years.

That was a matter of sitting with Richard and Tom on the stage and then working with Bradley to pick and choose what we needed to hear and what you don’t want to hear in order to make those eras believable.

So as we went through the eras and we hit the color sections of the ’70s and ’80s, all of a sudden more foley is being played, and it’s more complicated.

But the challenge foley-wise in the black and white scenes was to make it all sound believable to the era. Like today, if you pay attention to a foley track, the person three levels back in the scene, you delicately hear the foley for them. But in 1943, that wasn’t the case. So we had to make sure that we didn’t take the viewer out of the movie. We’re mixing the movie in 2023, but we had to mix the eras.

 



The Sound and Music of Maestro


The Sound and Music of Maestro | SoundWorks Collection

Another thing Richard talked about was the sound effects in the sections where there was no music. The effects were musical in their scope and feel – to keep the musical feeling of the film going. Richard said they used a lot of wind sounds in a musical way, as well as birds and other natural sounds. Can you talk about your approach to mixing those more ambient sounds to keep the tone and mood of the scene going in the absence of music?

DZ: The whole track is musical. Everything about the track has a rhythm to it by design between Richard and Bradley and us.

Winds are a very big part of this movie – from delicate, nice, pastoral-type winds when their relationship is nice and growing and they fall in love to more tumultuous winds as their relationship starts to falter. The textures of the winds were very important.

It’s a very emotional thing when you’re mixing winds. It’s how it makes me feel that determines how I’m going to play it.

It’s a very emotional thing when you’re mixing winds. It’s how it makes me feel that determines how I’m going to play it. No pun intended, but you’re just riding the wind as the scene is emotionally telling you how to mix it.

TO: There’s like a wave and a flow to it that is a lot like orchestra playing – how things swell and dive out and come back and change between the different parts.

In many ways, this is all over the movie. The movie is designed to be symphonic, the whole thing and not just the music, because it has this flow to it and this grace, and this lyrical way of moving.

DZ: Even in the great iconic scene of the argument, the one-shot scene in their apartment during the parade. The crowds outside that scene, those Thanksgiving crowds, they’re ebbing and flowing as the argument is building. There’s a rhythm to that argument, too. If you listen to the dialogue, the way they’re speaking the dialogue is very rhythmic. And so once in a while, you’ll hear a bleed of a marching band go by or the crowd will cheer, but that’s all very much designed in a rhythm to the scene because life outside is going on while this argument is happening.

 



Watch a Thanksgiving Day Tirade in ‘Maestro’ | Anatomy of a Scene


Watch a Thanksgiving Day Tirade in ‘Maestro’ | Anatomy of a Scene | The New York Times

Yeah, and the sound of their kids yelling through the door, saying, “What are doing in there?” Those interruptions have a really musical feel to them…

DZ: Yeah, that’s the theme of the whole movie.

 

For you, what stands out about the sound of Maestro? Why should it win the Oscar for Best Sound?

TO: This mix and the sound of this movie is all about elegance and it’s about sophistication. It’s not about being bombastic. It’s not about hitting you over the head with anything. It’s about precision and the musical flow of the entire thing.

It’s about precision and the musical flow of the entire thing.

So it’s really a very delicate, nuanced thing, and that’s what I hope people can recognize. It’s not a matter of density; it’s not a matter of having tons of sound. It’s not a matter of how hard it is, or anything. It’s a matter of how precise it is. It spans these really intimate, delicate scenes all the way to these giant performances, like Ely where it’s this massive thing, but it’s all a matter of grace and beauty.

DZ: And if it didn’t take you out when you’re watching it and you believed every frame, then every department did their job. If we didn’t do our job well, all those beautiful costumes and that remarkable makeup and those beautiful performances, we would have tanked some of it if we didn’t stay true just like all those other departments.

Aside from sound, not only did Bradley have to learn to conduct, he had to learn to conduct like Lenny.

 

There’s that really great scene near the end of the film where Leonard is at the university instructing a group of students on how to conduct an orchestra. Every time the kid conducts it, you hear the differences – it’s a little bit different. And then Leonard gets up and conducts, and it’s definitely different. It’s really amazing! The performers and Bradley as the conductor were able to create those differences…

TO: That whole scene is all recorded live. That’s all real. When it came to the M&E, it was a problem because the whole music track has dialogue on it because all those players are sitting right there and they’re right up on them. So when Bradley is talking, it’s all in the mics of the orchestra.

Again, there was some little subtle trickery to make sure that there were those noticeable changes and differences to the performance in particular, that it was a little more wowing when Lenny did his part. But yeah, that’s all real.

 

That was all my questions! Thank you guys so much for doing this interview…

TO: Thank you.

DZ: Thank you so much.

 

A big thanks to Tom Ozanich and Dean Zupancic for giving us a behind-the-scenes look at the mix of Maestro and to Jennifer Walden for the interview!

 

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  • This library contains recordings of eleven different types of doors specifically chosen for their interesting sound. I performed all actions with a lot of detail covering “open/close”, “knocks”, “bangs and thuds”, “handle grab and rattle” and when possible also “crackles and squeaks” (all recorded at various intensities)

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Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • Royal Cannon is a mini sound library created by sound designer Barney Oram. It features recordings of a British royal cannon salute, fired by six WW1 field guns in February of 2020, to mark the 68th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. All sounds in the library are contained within one single 192kHz 24bit WAV file, with 23 individual takes contained within.

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    Behind the Scenes Video:


    Royal Cannon


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  • Introducing “Presage – Boutique Horror Instrument,” our inaugural Kontakt Instrument designed to evoke spine-chilling terror and suspense. Featuring an array of meticulously crafted sounds including Dark Impacts, Slams, Attic Rumbles, Bowed Wood and Cymbals, Bells, Clock Ticks, Typewriter SFX, Drones and Atmospheres, Scrapes, Stingers, a Victrola Needle, and much more.

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