Asbjoern Andersen


Game audio middleware is rapidly changing the game audio landscape – so just how do you make sure you have the right skills to work on current and future game projects?

One way is to enroll in an online course to get up to speed – and that’s exactly what experienced game audio educator Leonard Paul offers. He’s been teaching game audio since 2001, and is currently running the School of Video Game Audio, offering online game audio courses in Wwise, FMOD Studio, Unity3D and Pure Data.

How do the courses work, what’s happening in the world of game audio education – and what’s needed to stay up-to-date on game audio creation? I decided to have a talk with Leonard Paul to find out:

 

Hi Leonard, please introduce yourself and how you got started doing courses in game audio:

Hi Asbjoern, many thanks for your invite to share a bit about the School of Video Game Audio with your community.

I started working in video games in 1994 and my first work with game sound was doing graphics and audio coding for a little “easter egg” for NBA Live ’95 by Electronic Arts on the Sega Genesis. If you happen to play the game all the way through the playoffs and lose the finals then you’re sent to a little golf mini-game that I coded. In the early 2000’s, I transitioned out of coding and moved more into composing and sound design for games.

Leonard Paul, at the Audio Engineering Society Education Fair

Leonard Paul, at the Audio Engineering Society Education Fair

Some of the highlights for me working with audio in games was working a bit with Rahzel for NBA Live 2k whose vocal effects were used for a lot of the menu sound effects. For EA’s NBA Jam I had the pleasure of working with the music of Vago, Hazel and DJ Kemo (Vanguards) to remix their songs so they would adapt to gameplay. I was fortunate enough to help license and remix the work of electronic music pioneer Jon Hopkins for the indie game Vessel to enable his music to dynamically underscore the player’s progress in the game’s puzzles. Retro City Rampage has been a great indie project to work on, so working as the sound designer, being one of the composers and publishing the soundtrack has been great fun.

In film, I was the composer for The Corporation which is Canada’s top-grossing documentary to this date. Now over ten years later, I’m enjoying scoring an exciting new documentary called Beep: A Documentary History of Video Game Music & Sound.

My work in game audio education began in 2001 when I taught a few game audio courses at a private college and I found out that I really enjoyed it.

I feel that teaching is a great way to keep learning and a fun way to connect with people in life

A few years later, I was hired by the Vancouver Film School and started the game audio stream within their sound design programme. Besides the School of Video Game Audio, I teach a bit at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design but with more of a focus more on graphics and interaction utilizing the Pure Data coding environment. I feel that teaching is a great way to keep learning and a fun way to connect with people in life.
 

Traditionally, a lot of people in game audio have been self-taught. Is that something you see changing these years?

I believe that it takes time for institutions to create courses for emerging disciplines such as video games so the people at the beginning are often either self-taught or transfer their skills from similar domains. At Simon Fraser University I graduated with an Honours in Computer Science and an Extended Music Minor over the course of eight years and had a lot of fun in my studies. As it turned out, I ended up taking many courses that informed my work within game audio but didn’t necessarily set out to do so at the time. Although I’ve spent a good amount of time at university, I don’t believe that having a formal education is in any way a requirement to working in games.

A recent major shift in the game audio industry has been the standardization that middleware such as Wwise and FMOD Studio have created. When I first started teaching game audio you usually learned how to use the audio tool set unique for each gaming platform unless your company had its own cross-platform in-house software. It was quite difficult to teach game audio in these days as access to the tools actually used in professional game audio was quite restricted.

With great middleware we’re able to focus more on the results rather struggling against the technology

Now that middleware companies are allowing widespread access to their technologies it is making it easier to prepare people for the game audio industry. With great middleware we’re able to focus more on the results rather struggling against the technology. I think that the main challenge is to continually push the boundaries of game audio and experiment with new possibilities. I want to push myself to try new things and deepen my experiences in life.
 

What is the School of Video Game Audio, and what kind of courses do you offer?

The School of Video Game Audio is a set of online courses designed to help people improve their skills in game audio. The courses currently focus on creating demo reels using Wwise, FMOD Studio, Unity3D and Pure Data. The goal of the courses is to help students convey their skills in the best way possible to potential employers through their demo reels.

I feel that a hands-on learning approach is one of the best ways to learn game audio skills so I utilize my experiences in the industry to adjust the courses to reflect how things are currently working in the industry. Since we don’t give grades in our courses, students can customize the course to suit their own needs and we can focus on areas where they would like the most guidance and feedback. So far we’ve had hundreds of students from over 35 different countries join us so I hope that we are also helping to create a community that has a positive effect on the games industry as a whole.
 

How do you decide what students need to learn on a given course?

The courses at the school are meant to be flexible to adjust to the student’s needs. For example, students that are already currently employed in the industry can skip the demo reel portion of the course and focus more on the middleware itself. Also, for students that have skills in composing can get detailed feedback on how to produce interactive scores while other students can choose to focus on sound design.

Our most successful students already have strong skills in audio and are looking to increase their knowledge of game audio middleware

Currently we do not teach the basics of sound design or composition for games but we are planning courses to help students to learn more introductory game audio skills for the future. Our most successful students already have strong skills in audio and are looking to increase their knowledge of game audio middleware.

Since I have a technical background, I can definitely help anyone who is interested in the basics of coding if they show an interest. Besides learning scripting in our Unity3D course, none of the courses require any coding. I believe that it is very important for a student to learn game audio within a real game so we spend a lot of time keeping our courses up to date with the latest versions of the audio middleware and continually improve the games used to allow for additional game audio implementation.
 

How does a course work? Can you describe the typical flow? And how much feedback do students get from you?

The current courses are split into two halves with the first month being a selection of videos and quizzes combined with weekly mini-projects. All of the mini-projects are oriented towards the demo reel game requirements. In general, the mini-projects include review of one’s sound design and implementation of footsteps, real-time effects, weapon sounds and monster sounds. For the second half of the course, the student focuses on creating all of the audio content required for their demo reel game.
For students requiring more than the default two month enrollment, our courses can be extended as long as needed by purchasing extra months of time.

The course is specifically designed to allow people with other priorities to learn the information that they need within a relatively short period of time

There are no real-time chats, webinars or other elements of the course that require the student to be at their computer at set times. The course is specifically designed to allow people with other priorities to learn the information that they need within a relatively short period of time.

Students receive as much feedback as they like for any of their projects including the final demo reel. For the demo reel I give very detailed feedback on all elements from the script, picture editing, sound design, composition help, vocal production and whatever else is needed to help them produce the strongest demo reel possible.

The school has recently grown large enough that I needed to find help with reviewing student work and I’ve been very happy to have Viviana Caro join the school in 2014. She brings a wealth of audio and education experience to the team and helps allows the school to reach even more people. It’s exciting to see the school grow and very inspiring to hear back from students that have found contracts and jobs within the industry.
 


Popular on A Sound Effect right now - article continues below:

 

Latest releases:  
  • Foley MOVES Play Track 772+ sounds included $115 $89

    MOVES is a collection of character foley clothing and gear movements that cover a large range of characters such as Special Forces, Medieval Soldier, World War Soldier, Policeman, and High-tech Soldier among many others.

    MOVES will make a great addition to your sonic arsenal and help you achieve that personal character sound that you have in your head. MOVES does not replace a Veteran Foley artist, but will come in handy if you have a restricted budget or if you need a good sound to enhance the movements of your characters.

    You get several walks, runs and stop movements for every type of character.

    Two versions included:

    To speed up your workflow, the library comes with two versions of the same content, tailored for people working either in the Video Game or the Cinema industry:

    Video Game Workflow: For every variation, you will have a single wav file, making it ideal for people who like to have every sound already cut and ready to be used in their DAW or middleware. It consists of 772 sounds.
    Cinema Workflow You will find several variations of the sounds in single wav files here. It consists of 151 wav files sounds.

    And as mentioned, both versions are included, so you can pick whatever works best for your way of working.


    Features props and characters such as:

    Bullet-proof vest, medieval chain mail, dress, leather jacket, old robot, policeman, World War II soldier, Special Forces, Thin Android, Winter Jacket, medieval foot soldier, plastic character, rattle character, shield, sword, weapons, helmets, high tech soldier, winter jacket

    As always, all sounds are embedded with useful Soundminer metadata. I really hope you will find this collection inspiring and useful in your future projects.

    Have a great day designing your new characters with MOVES!

    Best wishes,
    Michel Marchant.

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  • Motorcycles Helmet Wind Noise Play Track 21 sounds included, 97 mins total $35 $25

    This library gets you 97 minutes of binarual recordings of wind noise, captured inside the helmet as a motorcycle rides along the highway. The speed ranges from a slower pace all the way up to 100 – 130 km/h, and features both acceleration, variable and constant speeds, as well as occasional sounds of passing traffic as captured from inside the helmet. The helmet is a flip-up type of helmet, and the motorcycle is a Honda NC 700D.

    Recorder: Tascam dr100 mk/III, Microphone: DPA 4060 miniature omni

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    Jungles, walla, rivers, crickets, waterfalls, streets and rural villages all unique to Laos.

    All sounds were recorded using the Sound Devices Mix Pre 6 and a stereo pair of Sennheiser MKH 8020s.

    To read about my field recording trip to Laos and to download the free sample pack simply click here.

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  • Human Ethereal Breaths Vol.1 Play Track 132 sounds included $14 $10

    Collection of Abstract and Ethereal Breaths. Recorded Binaurally with optimum results when played back through headphones.

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    All files in WAV format with embedded Metadata fully Soundminer compliant.

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  • DANZA MACABRA is a collection of sound effects made out of real instruments recorded with Barcus Berry contact microphone.

    Unusual tones and timbres came out while bowing and scratching violin and cello or “playing” an upright piano with “string piano technique” using different metal objects.

    Danza Macabra comprises 45 loops at 140 bpm of designed clocks, tick loops, wooden old pendolo and time design elements. Designed glockenspiel and ride cymbals, morphed cinematic elements you will not find elsewhere.

    The sounds contained in Danza Macabra are great when treated with different amount of pitch-shifting to get never heard before sonic results.

    An exclusive collection to satisfy your sound design addiction.

    Features elements and sounds such as:

    • Accent
    • Cinematic elements
    • Clock loops
    • Cymbals
    • Designed glockenspiel
    • Getez – raw
    • Hybrid hits
    • Pianoverse
    • Screech reverse pass by
    • Textures
    • Tuning noises
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Need specific sound effects? Try a search below:
 

What’s your best piece of career advice when it comes to getting into game audio?

Similar to almost anything in life that’s worthwhile, I don’t believe that there’s a shortcut to having a successful career in game audio. I believe everyone’s career path is different so one of the best things I can do is try to offer personalized advice and support. If I had to give general advice, I would say that it’s important to try to be a good person and to do your best to help others. Learning the specific tools in game audio is important but the tools are constantly changing so knowing how to work with others is key. I try to help people in the best way I can during the time that I share with them–this was a core reason why I started the school.
 

What trends are you noticing in game audio?

The trend that I hope to see is the inclusion of more women in the game audio industry. It’s a very complex issue so I won’t try to offer much comment here but with a 2014 GameSoundCon Game Audio Industry Survey finding that “Game Audio is overwhelmingly male (96%)” we can see that there is a systemic issue in game audio that should be addressed to help achieve a better balance for the future. This issue may be related to today’s relatively low number of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and professional audio jobs but could also be related to the climate for women in the games industry as well.

There is a systemic issue in game audio that should be addressed to help achieve a better balance for the future.

I think that we can be inspired by the positive work that is being done in related job industries to improve the balance and work to help improve things in our own field over time as well.

My hope for the school is that we can reach a wide population of people who are inspired to create games that reflect their own unique experiences and culture.

 

In your experience, what’s the one thing students find hardest in game audio?

I’ve found that students typically feel that the most difficult thing in game audio is dealing with coding and implementation but I feel that the answer is a bit more complex. Learning coding languages is really similar to learning regular human languages except that with coding you’re communicating with a machine. Understanding a bit about how code works is like learning a few phrases from a phrase book–it gives you small insight into what game audio has to offer.

I don’t believe that you need to learn so much code that you’re fluent, but games are an interactive art form and code is often a large part of making a game. It can be difficult getting over the initial challenges of learning how code works but I find that students are really excited once they start to see how it can support their artistic vision.
 

What are your future plans for the School of Game Audio – and when are your next courses starting up?

We’re starting a new course in Pure Data in March 2015. I’ve been working with Pure Data and games since I first started teaching in 2001 so it’s really exciting for me to be able to offer help to students wanting to learn more about Pure Data.

The course size is limited and can be booked here. The course is OS X & Windows compatible and will focus on using Pure Data from a game audio perspective. Pure Data has recently gained more widespread use directly in games such as Fract OSC by using the LibPD code library.

Video Thumbnail

Leonard Paul, demonstrating how Pure Data is being used to make the generative music and procedural sound design of Sim Cell

LibPD will be featured and I will detail on how I used Pure Data for games such as Sim Cell. Students will be able to change their Pure Data audio content, synthesis, effects, logic and overall implementation behaviours in real-time while the game is running. This is meant to give students exposure and training similar to next-gen audio workflows such as the AMP system used on Rockstar’s GTA V.

Besides our new course, we’re planning a few new ways to help people learn more about game audio that we’ll be revealing over the next year. I’m inspired to hear what happens next in game audio and I’m very happy to be a part of this exciting industry!

A big thanks to Leonard Paul for highlighting what the School of Video Game Audio has to offer! To find out more about the school and the online game audio courses, go here.
 

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  • Sci-Fi Slinky Pews and Pows Play Track 156+ sounds included, 24 mins total $10.99

    Sounds for you to use for sci fi lasers, thin sheets of ice and electricity popping sounds recorded with a contact microphone and a slinky.

    Inspired by thin ice sound recordings and huge pictures of power lines, I recorded a slinky with a contact microphone in order to get some sounds for some thin ice. I ended up with a lot of sci fi lasers and “star trek torpedos.” With some cool bouncing popping electricity stuff, take a listen and pick up a copy to throw in your library when creating sci fi stuff and/or some electricity being sent through power lines!!

    Here is a little demo. I think some cool sounds were captured. with the 96k recording you can pitch it quite harshly and get some fine stuff…..the last 2 laser “blasts” have been pitched for you to hear. the first one at 20% of the original speed and the last at 15%. Feel free to send me an email if you want to hear more.

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    Looking for UI sound effects? The Advanced UI collection gets you a wide range of interface sound effects – from natural, organic and minimal pops, beeps and chirps to 8-Bit, hybrid and highly processed, electronic and digital SFX that will complete almost any project where UI/UX sounds are required. + Includes embedded Soundminer meta data.

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  • A collection of authentic Italian motorcycles and scooters – includes recordings of models like the Guzzi, Ciao Piaggio, Vespa and Ducati. Recordings include pass-bys, onboard, starting, idle, stopping, horn honking – and even skidding (see the full track list below).

    Just updated!

    This library has just been updated with 72 new recordings (47+ minutes) of motorcycles & scooters such as the APRILIA 150cc, LAMBRETTA 125cc, MALAGUTI 50cc, MOTOMORINI Scrambler 1200cc, MV AGUSTA F3 600, PIAGGIO X9 500cc and a VESPA 125 ET3 PRIMAVERA

    Add to cart
 
Explore the full, unique collection here

Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • Foley MOVES Play Track 772+ sounds included $115 $89

    MOVES is a collection of character foley clothing and gear movements that cover a large range of characters such as Special Forces, Medieval Soldier, World War Soldier, Policeman, and High-tech Soldier among many others.

    MOVES will make a great addition to your sonic arsenal and help you achieve that personal character sound that you have in your head. MOVES does not replace a Veteran Foley artist, but will come in handy if you have a restricted budget or if you need a good sound to enhance the movements of your characters.

    You get several walks, runs and stop movements for every type of character.

    Two versions included:

    To speed up your workflow, the library comes with two versions of the same content, tailored for people working either in the Video Game or the Cinema industry:

    Video Game Workflow: For every variation, you will have a single wav file, making it ideal for people who like to have every sound already cut and ready to be used in their DAW or middleware. It consists of 772 sounds.
    Cinema Workflow You will find several variations of the sounds in single wav files here. It consists of 151 wav files sounds.

    And as mentioned, both versions are included, so you can pick whatever works best for your way of working.


    Features props and characters such as:

    Bullet-proof vest, medieval chain mail, dress, leather jacket, old robot, policeman, World War II soldier, Special Forces, Thin Android, Winter Jacket, medieval foot soldier, plastic character, rattle character, shield, sword, weapons, helmets, high tech soldier, winter jacket

    As always, all sounds are embedded with useful Soundminer metadata. I really hope you will find this collection inspiring and useful in your future projects.

    Have a great day designing your new characters with MOVES!

    Best wishes,
    Michel Marchant.

    23 %
    OFF
    Ends 1545174000
  • Motorcycles Helmet Wind Noise Play Track 21 sounds included, 97 mins total $35 $25

    This library gets you 97 minutes of binarual recordings of wind noise, captured inside the helmet as a motorcycle rides along the highway. The speed ranges from a slower pace all the way up to 100 – 130 km/h, and features both acceleration, variable and constant speeds, as well as occasional sounds of passing traffic as captured from inside the helmet. The helmet is a flip-up type of helmet, and the motorcycle is a Honda NC 700D.

    Recorder: Tascam dr100 mk/III, Microphone: DPA 4060 miniature omni

    29 %
    OFF
  • City Life Laos Play Track 153+ sounds included, 353 mins total $75 $60

    Jungles, walla, rivers, crickets, waterfalls, streets and rural villages all unique to Laos.

    All sounds were recorded using the Sound Devices Mix Pre 6 and a stereo pair of Sennheiser MKH 8020s.

    To read about my field recording trip to Laos and to download the free sample pack simply click here.

    20 %
    OFF
  • Human Ethereal Breaths Vol.1 Play Track 132 sounds included $14 $10

    Collection of Abstract and Ethereal Breaths. Recorded Binaurally with optimum results when played back through headphones.

    8 tracks containing 132 SFX in Total, varying levels of reverb reverse whooshes and abstract breathing patterns.

    All files in WAV format with embedded Metadata fully Soundminer compliant.

    29 %
    OFF
    Ends 1545174000
  • DANZA MACABRA is a collection of sound effects made out of real instruments recorded with Barcus Berry contact microphone.

    Unusual tones and timbres came out while bowing and scratching violin and cello or “playing” an upright piano with “string piano technique” using different metal objects.

    Danza Macabra comprises 45 loops at 140 bpm of designed clocks, tick loops, wooden old pendolo and time design elements. Designed glockenspiel and ride cymbals, morphed cinematic elements you will not find elsewhere.

    The sounds contained in Danza Macabra are great when treated with different amount of pitch-shifting to get never heard before sonic results.

    An exclusive collection to satisfy your sound design addiction.

    Features elements and sounds such as:

    • Accent
    • Cinematic elements
    • Clock loops
    • Cymbals
    • Designed glockenspiel
    • Getez – raw
    • Hybrid hits
    • Pianoverse
    • Screech reverse pass by
    • Textures
    • Tuning noises
 
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