Away Netflix sound design Asbjoern Andersen


Atmos mixing, IRs, and extreme EQ treatments helped to make things feel very real for the crew in Netflix's new dramatic series Away. Here, we go behind the sound with re-recording mixer Greg King and sound designer/re-recording mixer Jon Greasley.
Interview by Jennifer Walden, photos courtesy of Netflix, and Will Thoren. Please note: Contains spoilers
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Sending a crewed mission to Mars seems more possible with each passing day. What tolls would the long trip take on the crew? What perils could they face in space, isolated from assistance on Earth? Netflix’s new series Away explores the potential physical and emotional impacts of long-distance space travel in a realistic (non-sci-fi) sort of way.

Sound designer/re-recording mixer Jon Greasley and re-recording mixer Greg King of King Soundworks brought the mission to life by making the environment inside the space capsule feel like a living machine. Life support systems, like water filtration and air ventilation, clatter and tick behind the walls. They use the Atmos surround field to immerse the viewer in the crews’ experience. In contrast, the sound team chose to be more constrained with their mix of the sounds on Earth, pulling sounds out of the Atmos surround field.

Here, King and Greasley discuss this approach to mixing and other ways they used sound — like applying IRs from various sized metal containers and using extreme EQ processing for the spacewalk sounds — to create a realistic, believable trip to Mars for Away.

 

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Away | Official Trailer | Netflix

You’ve gone from the Cosmos: Possible Worlds docu-series — where you created sound for these abstract and mind-blowing scientific theories and facts — to the more practical, tactile, tangible view of space in Netflix’s Away series. How do these two experiences of creating sound for space compare to each other?

Greg King (GK): It was different and the same in a sense.

Cosmos was all reality; it was about showing the world and the cosmos in a way that not very many people get to see. So we had to create this world, this environment that was fantastical but still felt real and organic.

Although we wanted to help the story and the wonder of space, we still had to keep it within the realm of the plausible…

The same is kind of true for Away, in the sense that, although it’s a fictional series, it’s plausible. It’s quite likely that NASA or some variation thereof will be doing a manned mission to Mars in the relatively near future.

Although we wanted to help the story and the wonder of space, we still had to keep it within the realm of the plausible and had to treat it in a realistic fashion. We never crossed over into a purely science fiction world. We tried to be grounded in reality — authentic and possible. The approach we took going into the series was with that in mind.

Jon Greasley (JG): As Greg said, both approaches were within the realm of possibility. With Cosmos, it was a bit more fantastical because the imagery would take us inside, for example, the nucleus of an atom. That is a real thing but no one is ever going to experience what that sounds like.

Whereas with Away, it didn’t feel futuristic — to me it’s like the show is set in an alternate present, one where we collectively decided to invest in our future and exploration rather than wars of choice, for example. From the set design to the concepts, everything was completely conceivable within our lifetimes. It needed to sound like tech that you could believe would be on a ship that Space X might build a decade from now or something like that.

 

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On the dub stage at King Soundworks. Photo by: Will Thoren

There are so many great references and ideas of what space should/could sound like. What were some of your inspirations when deciding how outer space in Away should sound? What’s unique about your version of how space travel can sound?

GK: Globally, we wanted the ship to be a character because they’re on the ship for a long time. They’re traveling to Mars and it takes several months. We didn’t want the ship to be just a place; we wanted it to be one of the characters in the story.

We made the decision early on to have a lot of mechanical things in the ship. There was going to be physical mechanisms rather than everything being digital and on the circuit board. We wanted to imagine in our minds a ship that had a lot of mechanical things in it, like gyros and mechanisms roaring and starting up. So that while there is a scene going on with dialogue and storytelling, the ship could still be this living, breathing thing in the background to constantly keep you aware of the fact that you are moving through space and that, more importantly, their lives were held in the balance, reliant on this ship operating properly.

We wanted the audience to feel the ship and hear it working.

When you’re watching the show, or any space show, you take for granted that the travelers are going to be safe and sound. But we never wanted the audience to be off the hook like that. We wanted the audience to always be aware that this is something that could fail. They even address failures in a multiple-episode arc on the show when the water system failed. Failures can happen and they can be life-threatening.

We didn’t want any instances of failures on the ship to be a surprise, to come out of nowhere. We wanted the audience to feel the ship and hear it working. And that’s where Jon took it to the next level. He created these mechanisms, like the air filtration system would have vents that open and close. The water system should have valves that open and close. The ship should be making navigational adjustments with little boosters that they have on the outside of the ship. All of these things should always be active so that we always feel like the ship is alive. Then, when something goes wrong, we have already set up the premise for that and it ups the ante.

Jon had the challenge of figuring out how to give these mechanisms a mechanical base but make them feel like they are more sophisticated, more elegant future-tech.

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JG: The ship is a character and so it’s constantly reminding the audience that it is there even when the characters are just sitting around the table in the crew galley, conversing about whatever issues they are dealing with, either on their mission or back home.

They spend a lot of time in that setting and you are constantly reminded that the ship is ticking away in the background. There’s a tension and a peril to that because they’re in this tin can completely isolated from their families and they only have the resources that are on board with them (i.e., no help is coming). They are separated from 100%-guaranteed death by this cocoon they are in. So the tension that goes with their ship constantly ticking along reminds you subliminally that they are at the mercy of everything going the way it was planned and designed to.

Once you set up that baseline environment of this ship functioning in the background, you can add to it or take away from it when something goes wrong. These are little, subliminal shifts that people will hopefully not notice outright but will register on some level as they’re taking the story in.

They are separated from 100%-guaranteed death by this cocoon they are in.

To answer the other part of your question, about what makes our approach to space unique — you’ve got the two camps of Star Trek and the Star Wars. With the latter, more fantasy-based approach, you hear everything because it’s a ‘big action’ palette and you need all of those lasers and explosions to tell that story.

The other side is completely realistic. There is a complete and utter lack of sound in space because space is a vacuum. That’s not particularly exciting from a story point of view. The one show I can think of that did no sound at all out in space was Firefly, and I always respected them for that, but we didn’t want to go that way.

The showrunners on Away made some bold choices with music; there are long sections that don’t have music. And when we go outside the ship for the first time in Ep. 2, minutes go by before any score comes in. So it was down to us to use sound to tell the story of what’s going on with the ship. At that point, the solar panels were opening and they malfunctioned. We talked about making that completely realistic, where every time they go outside the ship we won’t have sound or music. You’d just be going off the visual. You could do that if you wanted to be realistic but it doesn’t really tell the story in a way that sound effects can do. So, we opted to do a filtered-off/effected version of sounds so you’re not hearing sounds like you’d be on Earth, but it’s more like you’re experiencing the sounds in a visceral way; you’re feeling the vibrations through the ship or you’re feeling the sound as the characters would while in the spacesuits.

…you’re feeling the sound as the characters would while in the spacesuits.

Like, when they connect their tether to the ship, they have this tactile interaction with the ship and the vibrations of that would be heard/felt through the suit. So the audience’s experience of a sound mirrors what the characters would be experiencing when outside the ship.

 

It wouldn’t be an exciting space drama without a few treks outside the ship! How did you create the sounds for the astronauts’ movements when they’re working outside the ship? They’re non-literal sounds, so was it more about effects selection and processing? Or did you record sounds in non-traditional ways?

GK: It was more about processing and effects selection. A lot of it was Foley, too. We have a great Foley team — Stefan Fraticelli and Ron Mellegers — who did this season for us.

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Foley artist Stefan Fraticelli

If you go technically real for the exterior sounds in space, it’s a vacuum and so you wouldn’t hear anything. So we went with the concept of sound waves traveling as vibrations through objects. Like, if you put your ear up to a railroad track you can hear a train coming from miles away because of the vibration. So, if an astronaut’s hand is latching a carabiner onto a hook attached to the ship, then the sound would theoretically travel through their body and you’d get a sense of it. So we did that by recording the actual sound and then processing it mostly with EQ. We were bridging the two worlds of reality and unreality, where you have the vacuum of space but the sound could conceivably travel through the body to give you a faint sense of that sound.

There are moments where you can go completely silent and it has a nice dramatic effect. But for action, with people doing things and trying to get from point A to point B, the silence just doesn’t work. We used this hybrid approach to give you a sense of danger or a sense of how they’re just attached to the ship by this little tiny thread.

JG: In terms of the execution, it’s a mix of post-processing and actual recording. For processing, we did extreme EQs with steep filter roll-offs and extreme low/mid boosts. For some of the Foley for the spacesuits, I was boosting 20 dB of 250 – 300 Hz just to get this extreme resonance of the tactile feeling.

In terms of recording techniques for some of the specific props, the original idea we had was to use contact microphones. So you put a contact microphone on the surface and recorded the sound through the surface. But that’s really hit and miss. It depends a lot on the surface and how well it transfers vibrations through it. If the surface is very rigid, you don’t tend to get very much sound coming through it. The sounds you end up recording are thin and wimpy sounding. So that didn’t work out too well.

For processing, we did extreme EQs with steep filter roll-offs and extreme low/mid boosts.

The Foley team came up with a more practical solution, which was to mic the Foley as they normally would but then add a small mic either inside or behind whatever they were interacting with. So I always had two mics on the Foley for the spacewalk stuff and I could mix and match between the two or use one or the other. Then, with that extreme EQ, I could create the effect I wanted.

GK: We used the dialogue and the breathing to the same effect. We used varying degrees of futzing (processing to simulate audio coming through a radio or transmission) rather than just one fixed amount. The amount of futzing was always changing, depending on what was happening dramatically.

We had the actors record more breathing, too, so we could use that as a device.

For instance, if the actors are just talking and there’s not much happening action-wise, we have minimal futzing. The voice is more full-bodied. As the actors move away from camera and more into danger, we may intensify the futz and make it sound more pinched and smaller — like it’s coming through a crummy speaker or smaller microphone — to create a bigger sense of distance between us and them. We varied the amount of futzing to create a feeling of intimacy or a feeling of danger.

We did the same with the breathing where, if they’re spacewalking along the ship then they might be breathing at a faster rate or slower rate depending on the amount of tension or relief we wanted the audience to feel.

 

 

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The ship’s interior is filled with buttons, knobs, switches, alarms… what went into creating this palette of ‘functional’ ship sounds?

JG: We had our in-house library which is very expansive. So between that and all the other libraries that are available these days, we have every kind of switch and lever imaginable already recorded!

GK: For the creation of the environment inside the walls, Jon (along with fellow King Soundworks sound designer Dan Gamache) created all of these servos and mechanical sounds, for the air ventilation system and the water system and navigational adjustment system. All those mechanical whirs and whines that we hear, Jon either recorded or pulled from our library, and then processed and layered and edited those to until they sounded like they were tech from the near future.

JG: The biggest thing for making the ship interior sound convincing was to make them sound like they were coming from behind the walls, behind panels and sheets of metal. There was a lot of treatment on all the ship sounds to make them sound like they weren’t right there in the room with the people but were deep in the bowels of the ship. A big part of selling it was having it sound like there were layers of equipment that surrounded them.

There was a lot of treatment on all the ship sounds to make them sound like they weren’t right there in the room…

There are a lot of tactile sounds — a lot of switches and knobs — and we didn’t want there to be a lot of beeps and touchscreens because that tends to have a very disconnected feel. Having things sound more mechanical and like they’re solid objects that are physically moving instead of just feedback that’s coming out of the speaker, that always sounds more grounded in the action. So we definitely wanted to embrace it.

GK: Another aspect was that lucky for us, Netflix wanted to deliver the show in Dolby Atmos. So we used that as part of the soundscape for the difference between Earth and being in the ship. We made a conscious decision very early on that while we’re in the capsule that’s when we’re going to use the Atmos surround field to its full advantage so that we feel like we are in the ship with the crew and surrounded by these walls with all these mechanisms in them. We were using every aspect of the Dolby Atmos field — the side surrounds and the ceiling. We used all of that.

Then when we cut to Earth, we narrowed the sound field so that everything comes off the screen. We use less surrounds and — with the exception of one or two occasions, like the PA announcements in the Mission Control center — we tried to keep everything out of the Atmos field.

By reserving the Atmos field for the space ship, you feel completely immersed in that environment. You feel like you are in the cocoon of that ship.

By reserving the Atmos field for the space ship, you feel completely immersed in that environment. You feel like you are in the cocoon of that ship.

On Earth, it felt less immersive. But we did as many “home touches” as we could. Wherever we could we added voices, which was easy to do in the command center at the NASA facility, but when we’re in their houses in the suburbs, we wanted to always make sure we heard birds, or dogs, or a lawnmower, or something that always hinted to this as life-as-normal. It’s life-like.

This created a contrast with the space capsule, where all of that ‘life’ disappeared. It made you feel isolated in the capsule, and far away from Earth. That was another thing we could use to our advantage.

 

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There’s a great episode called ‘A Little Faith’ in which the ship’s water system fails. You hear it groaning behind the ship’s walls. Can you tell me about your approach to that sound?

JG: That crisis extends into the next episode even. They’re in a situation where it’s entirely possible that they could run out of water at any minute if the system fully breaks. So the soundscape carries from one episode into the next, and it’s a constant reminder of the danger that they are in.

There are a lot of shudders and shakes as the different parts of the system drop out one by one.

It was fun to evolve that soundscape as the story arc develops. We set up the mechanics of the ship and had that behind the walls, inside another layer of the ship sounds. We took it a step further. What’s important is that it has to conceptually resonate to the viewer. It’s essentially the plumbing going bad and so it has to sound like plumbing. But it doesn’t have to sound like house plumbing. So, it has this resonant metallic feel to it. All the sounds we picked have a definite feeling of metal resonating and vibrating. There are a lot of shudders and shakes as the different parts of the system drop out one by one.

Also, the way we established the feel of the ship prior to that point, with it kind of ticking away in the background (there was a kind of rhythm to it), when the water system starts to fail it’s a lot more violent and becomes much more to the forefront. Things kind of jump out of nowhere.

There isn’t as much rhythm to it. It’s more jarring. It puts you off your balance and on your back foot and you’re worried about it.

 

What was in your processing chain to make it feel like the sounds were coming from inside the ship’s walls?

JG: It’s mostly made out of convolution reverbs taken from inside metal containers. It may be an impulse response taken from inside a small pipe, all the way up to large metal structures.

There are a couple of impulse responses in Audio Ease’s Altiverb that I used a lot, and those were captured inside a water tower and another was inside a giant metal pipe used to house fiber optic cables that they lay across the ocean floor. Someone at Audio Ease I believe went inside one of these giant cylinders and recorded an IR to capture what that environment sounds like. That was really cool to use, to give a sense of being encased in metal.

 

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Foley team’s mixture for Martian dirt

When the astronauts are on Mars, how did you effect the sound there? There’s an atmosphere on Mars so sound waves can travel…

JG: Yes, there is an atmosphere on Mars. And I looked up what kind of atmosphere Mars has and how that would affect the sound just to get a baseline for what reality would be. I found out that the atmosphere on Mars would make things sound thinner, less bassy, and the sound wouldn’t travel as far. Depending on where the story goes, that is something that we could potentially have more fun with.

The idea for the atmosphere that we built for the end of Ep. 10 was based off that idea that when they are outside the ship while it’s in space, everything sounds boomy, thick, and thuddy. In contrast, when they get to Mars, everything is thinner and wispier. It’s nice to have those two play off of each other in that way.

 

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How did you use sound to help intensify the experience of landing on Mars?

GK: We wanted to make that as scary as humanly possible. No one has ever landed on Mars before. The broad stroke of that sequence was to make it sound like at any second that capsule was going to get ripped apart and the crew wasn’t out of danger until they touched down. That was the overall concept, that they’re not safe until they’re safe. They could shred at any possible second.

It cuts back and forth between these tense moments and these tender moments…

JG: The cool thing about the way the sequence is constructed is that it’s cutting back and forth between the families back at Mission Control listening to what could potentially be the final messages from the astronauts that they would ever hear and the astronauts themselves landing on Mars. It cuts back and forth between these tense moments and these tender moments of the children and husbands and wives taking in these messages from the crew.
 


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    • Native v6: AAX Native, AU, VST

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  • Realtime Pitchshifting PlugIn version 2!

    Elastique Pitch is the real time pitch shifting solution for RTAS, VST, AU and AAX. Powered by zplane’s élastiquePro pitch shifting engine which is used by millions of end users around the world, the plugin ensures the highest, program independent pitch shifting quality.

    Elastique Pitch focuses on the essential things: you won’t find any unnecessary or confusing controls or functionality. Instead, the plugin offers you quality, stability, and ease of use.

    In the second edition we´ve added a feedback delay and the infiniSTRETCH function of the new élastiquePro v3 engine. Both make it easy to use Elastique Pitch in a more creative way.

    The key features of Elastique Pitch V2 are:

    • multi channel: support for synchronous pitching of up to 8 audio channels
    • real time: no offline pre-analysis required
    • feedback with delay for more creative usage
    • Three different views
    • Program-independent high quality with the highly-acclaimed élastiquePro v3 engine (speech, single-voiced, classical/popular music, etc.)
    • phase coherence: absolute phase stability between all channels
    • MIDI input: for pitch control
    • formant shifting: shift formants independent from pitch
    • factory presets: for typical film pull-ups/pull-downs
    • AU, VST, AAX and RTAS support for Mac & PC

    technical specifications

    • audio format: 1-8 channels (I/O), 44.1-192kHz sample rate
    • plugin format: AAX, RTAS, AU, VST
    • pitch range: ± 12 semitones = 50-200%
    • timbre range: ± 12 semitones = 50-200%
    • plugin latency: 150ms @48kHz
    • min. system CPU: 2GHz
    • OS: MacOsX >10.6.8, Windows 2000/XP, Vista, Win7/8
    • Host: Pro Tools > V8

    DOWNLOAD THE DEMO HERE
    WIN | MAC

  • An equalizer is probably the tool you use most while mixing and mastering, so you need the best of the best. With FabFilter Pro-Q 3, you get the highest possible sound quality, a very extensive feature set, and a gorgeous, innovative interface with unrivalled ease of use.

    Mixing and mastering features
    Pro-Q 3 offers everything that a demanding engineer could wish for: top-quality linear phase operation in addition to the zero latency and unique Natural Phase modes, smooth dynamic EQ, per-band mid/side processing, full surround support (up to Dolby Atmos 7.1.2), an intelligent solo feature, optional Auto Gain and a built-in, fully customizable spectrum analyzer.

    Effortlessly sculpt your sound
    FabFilter Pro-Q 3 is designed to help you achieve your sound in the quickest way possible. Via the large interactive EQ display, you can create bands where you need them, enable dynamic EQ for any band, and select and edit multiple bands at once.
    Unique features like Spectrum Grab, Full Screen mode and EQ Match will speed up your workflow even more. Try it yourself!

    FabFilter goodies
    Of course, you also get all the usual FabFilter goodies: perfectly tuned knobs, interactive MIDI Learn, undo/redo and A/B switch, Smart Parameter Interpolation for smooth parameter transitions, an extensive help file with interactive help hints, sample-accurate automation, advanced optimization and much more.

  • A crush on music

    Distortion and saturation play a very important role in music production. From subtle, clean and warm tube or tape saturation to the wildest multiband guitar amp effects: FabFilter Saturn 2 delivers.

    Saturn 2 introduces a host of new features such as a redesigned interface with modulation visualization, new subtle saturation and linear phase processing for mastering, many new distortion styles, and more.


    Warmth, harmonics, color and dynamics

    FabFilter Saturn 2 offers a range of different high quality distortion models, inspired by the vintage sound of tubes, tape, transformers and guitar amps. In addition, you get five creative FX distortion styles to mangle your sounds in weird and unexpected ways.

    With its multiband design and per-band feedback, dynamics, drive, tone and modulation options, Saturn 2 will bring a unique flavor to your music.

    Bring your sounds to life

    Add life and depth to your music using the extensive modulation section. By applying subtle modulation to crossover frequencies, dynamics, band levels or tone controls, great warmth and definition can be achieved.

    With all the XLFOs, EGs, XY controllers/sliders, envelope followers and MIDI sources you will ever need, you get practically unlimited modulation possibilities. Creating new modulation connections could not be easier: just drag and drop. And Saturn 2 visualizes all modulation in real-time to show exactly what’s going on.

    FabFilter goodies

    Finally, FabFilter Saturn 2 contains all the usual FabFilter goodies: perfectly tuned knobs, MIDI Learn, Smart Parameter Interpolation for smooth parameter transitions, interface resizing and full screen mode, support for Avid control surfaces, GPU-powered graphics acceleration, extensive help with interactive help hints, SSE optimization, and much more.

  • smart:comp is the latest addition to the product line of A.I. powered plug-ins by sonible. This unique spectro-dynamic compressor finds the parameters for well-balanced compression results in just a few seconds. Through frequency-selective processing, smart:comp also ensures unparalleled transparency. With this multidimensional approach, compression has evolved to the next level.

    smart:comp is the synergy of intelligently enhanced time-domain compression and trailblazing spectral compression. Behind the user-friendly and intuitive interface of this new plug-in, runs the smart:engine – an A.I.-based, content-aware system designed on the basis of psychoacoustic principles as well as extensive hands-on mixing experience.

    The time-domain compressor recommends the most appropriate settings for threshold, ratio, attack and release with a single click, as the spectral compression dynamically keeps an eye on the tonal balance of the input signal.

    The interrelated nature of compression parameters can make the crucial task of compression time-consuming and tedious. smart:comp significantly speeds up this process and delivers results with greater precision than ever, making it a valuable assistant for mixing and mastering professionals and aspiring talents alike. 

    Getting the best out of a track: content-aware parametrization and tonal balance
    When activating the learning mode of smart:comp, the plug-in analyzes the incoming audio signal and sets specific parameters that result in well-balanced compression – all with the familiar look and handling of a single band compressor.

    The spectral compression is all about giving a track the best possible definition and maximum transparency. By continuously analyzing the input signal across more than 2000 bands, smart:comp acts like an intelligent, ultra-high-resolution multiband compressor that dynamically smoothes out tonal imbalances. It only applies compression where it is really needed and therefore ensures a consistent tonal and dynamic balance at all times.

    Creating space: frequency-dependent sidechain ducking
    In order to seamlessly merge signals that compete for attention within the same spectral regions, smart:comp ‘listens’ for potential spectral clashes between the input and the sidechain signals, when operating in sidechain mode. By dynamically ducking affected frequency regions of the input signal, it creates space for the sidechain signal.

    Users’ choice – easy to use and fast
    smart:comp comes with a lean and intuitive user interface that allows for easy handling of this high-tech tool. Although the plug-in greatly assists in creating a fast workflow when the smart:engine is activated, users retain their control over the final outcome and are able to access and adjust all essential parameters.

    Similar to sonible’s smart:EQ 2, the new compressor plug-in smart:comp comes equipped with profiles for different audio sources. These profiles allow smart:comp to optimally adapt its internal processing to the characteristics of the respective input signal.

     “As compression is probably the most critical task in the mixing process, the development of smart:comp has been a fascinating challenge. Together with our engineering team, we wanted to take the next step in the evolution of audio compression – and now we can proudly say: We have taken it!”

    smart:comp – key features

    • Automatic, content-aware compression parametrization
    • Spectral compression with sensitivity control
    • Attack and release shaper
    • Frequency-dependent ducking in sidechain mode
    • Smart auto gain


The landing builds and builds to this crescendo of rattling panels on the outside of the ship and a few panels fly off, which we had a lot of fun with in the Atmos format. There is fire and pieces of metal flying around and overhead as they burn through the atmosphere as the sequence progresses. That was definitely one of the most fun sequences to put together and then mix as well.

 

Away_sound-17

Because this isn’t a theatrical release (it’s streaming for TV), were you limited to ‘broadcast spec’ or were you able to really use the LFE channel to add sufficient low-end to make the audience feel compressed like they’re feeling the G-forces as the shuttle was landing?

JG: We had to conform to a certain spec, but Netflix’s spec is ‘better’ than broadcast. I prefer mixing to their spec because it’s well-considered in terms of where they want the dialogue to sit with respect to the maximum peak-level. The dialogue level is a little bit lower than what would be ‘broadcast spec’ and that allowed us a little more headroom so we were able to get a little louder in the moments where we wanted to get more intense.

Then, of course, people are going to watch it in stereo. There will be people out there watching it on their AirPods or tablets or whatever and so we had to mix for that too. When you’re listening to the Atmos version of the mix, it’s huge and there is stuff flying everywhere but then we definitely wanted to make sure that if someone is listening to it on their Chromebook speakers that they don’t lose that sense of danger. It’s a difficult balance to make but it’s one that we were definitely very conscious of. We wanted to straddle that line so that no one missed out on that experience no matter how they were watching the show.

GK: We always do multiple mix passes on small stereo speakers at a lower volume so that we can make sure that all the things we want to get across emotionally, sound-wise, translate over to the small speakers. We always do a pass on that so that if you are watching on a tablet or even a TV with stereo speakers, you’re going to get as much as you can possibly get out of it. We’re not just mixing for the best possible scenario and format and hope that people at home have a huge home theater system. We’re extremely conscious that a very large number of people will be listening to this on smaller speakers. We want to make sure they get the same enjoyment out of it. So we do multiple passes where we turn the Atmos speakers off and monitor the mix so we can make adjustments for these tiny speakers at a low volume, so that we know people can hear it at home on their TVs the way that we intended.

 

A big thanks to Greg King and Jon Greasley for giving us a behind-the-scenes look at the sound of Away and to Jennifer Walden for the interview!

 

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THE WORLD’S EASIEST WAY TO GET INDEPENDENT SOUND EFFECTS:
 
A Sound Effect gives you easy access to an absolutely huge sound effects catalog from a myriad of independent sound creators, all covered by one license agreement - a few highlights:
 
 
  • Cinematic & Trailer Cinematic Feel Play Track 700+ sounds included, 59 mins total $59 $45

    Cinematic Feel is a plus to have for your cinematic productions and to add loudness to your mix. A package of Bass Drop, Boom, Bram, Downshifter, Drone, Riser, Rumble, Stinger, Whoosh and more. Dark, Light, Electronic and Natural feel.

    All that you need to make it huge!!

    Each sound has been meticulously edited individually, All files were recorded and are delivered in 24bit 96kHz Broadcast Wave files, all embedded with metadata information for easy import and ensure fast and easy workflow.

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  • Weapons of World War II is Super Thumps first of many sound libraries recorded and designed by film and video game industry veterans!
     
    This library features 14 different weapons, some of them quite rare, that were commonly used in World War II between German and American forces. The weapons were recorded at various distances, perspectives, and firing modes with a wide array of microphones. They have been compiled together and designed with a punch at 96,000 Hz, 24-bit, ready for you to easily drop into your project! Each weapon contains multiple variations and versions.
     


    Weapons included:

    M1919 Browning Machine Gun – Single Shots, Burst, Full Auto
    M1911 Colt 45 Pistol – Single Shots
    BAR M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle – Single Shots
    Gewehr 43 Rifle – Single Shots
    M3 Grease Gun Submachine Gun – Single Shots, Burst, Full Auto
    Karabiner K98 Rifle – Single Shots
    Luger Pistol – Single Shots
    M1 Carbine Rifle – Single Shots
    M1 Garand Rifle – Single Shots and Empty “Ping!” Shots
    MG42 Machine Gun – Burst, Full Auto
    MP40 Submachine Gun – Single Shots, Burst, Full Auto
    P38 Walther Pistol – Single Shots
    M1 Thompson Submachine Gun – Single Shots, Burst, Full Auto
    M1903 Springfield Sniper Rifle – Single Shots
  • Instruments Swell Play Track 500+ sounds included From: $18

    Swell is a performable Kontakt instrument and sound effects library designed to create natural sounding cymbal swells with a variety of different cymbals and performances. Cymbals include gongs, orchestral suspended cymbals, crashes, chinas, sizzle ride, and others.

    Swell is divided into 2 parts: natural and designed.

    The natural collection has recordings that are unaltered from their original performances and was created to produce clean, musical, natural sounding swells.

    The designed collection uses samples based on the natural recordings that have been transformed into entirely new and different sounds using heavy processing and layering. It was created to produce interesting design and transition sounds quickly and easily. Swell includes over 200 fully designed rises.

    In addition to the carefully recorded sounds we have created a truly useful and flexible Kontakt instrument. This instrument ties the mod wheel to an entire matrix of effect parameters that you can manipulate in real time for instant complexity.

    Swell is available in two versions

    Key features for the Swell Lite Collection

    • 70 unique recordings
    • full res total coverage of the Zildjian A Custom 18″ cymbal
    • fully functional kontakt instrument for the Zildjian A Custom 18″ cymbal
    • 25 designed cymbal swells with Kontakt instrument
    • option to upgrade to the full collection at any time for the difference in price
    • .nki files require full version of NI Kontakt 5.3 or higher

     
    Key features for the Swell Full Collection

    • 500+ unique recordings
    • The entire “Natural” collection
    • The entire “Designed” collection
    • 6.5 GB total
    • 12 Kontakt fully programmed unlocked .nki files
    • .nki files require full version of NI Kontakt 5.4.3 or higher

    Note: Can be used without Kontakt too!
    All Kontakt instrument libraries include fully unlocked and accessible metadata tagged .wav files. You don't need any version of Kontakt to use these files as a standalone sample library.
 
Explore the full, unique collection here

Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • Holograms is a versatile and comprehensive collection of hologram sound effects. It’s separated into modular categories, giving you maximum flexibility in designing holograms and holographic interactions of all shapes and sizes. Categories include small/medium/large hologram activations and drones, positive/negative/neutral ui beeps, interference, radio transmissions, alarms, and telemetry. The energy drone/activation source is also great for force fields, shields, and all manner of sci-fi energy textures.

    – 391 files
    – 948 total sounds
    – 96 kHz / 24 bit
    – modular categories to mix and match

  • Recording of a Swedish Strv 121 tank


    The Swedish 1989 Stridsvagn 121 (Strv 121) sound library provides 371 clips in 25.56 gigabytes of audio. Based off of the German Leopard 2A4, this tank showcases the sound of a 47.6 liter, V12 cylinder, diesel turbo engine.

    11 synchronized takes share a total of 29 onboard and exterior perspectives. The 20 onboard perspectives include recordings from the interior, exhaust, tracks, 3rd-person perspective, and engine with ramps and steady RPMs. The 9 exterior perspectives include slow, medium, and fast driving while the battle tank passes by, reverses, departs, and arrives. There are also shut downs, revving, idles, start ups and others. The package also provides bonus four-channel Ambisonic AMBEO recordings of the interior cabin, performed effects of steering wheel movements, mock driving performances, throttle moves and other sounds, and impulse response recordings from inside the vehicle.

    The sound library also shares complete embedded metadata support, 5 custom mixes of the onboard perspectives, metadata import files for keywords in seven languages: English, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, and Spanish, and easy-to-use mixing sessions.

  • Low-price. High-quality. Essential.

    A collection of 50 essential firework sound effects, including launches, crackles, whistles, close, distant and multi displays!

    The sounds are fully compatible with the Universal Category System (UCS) – a public domain initiative establishing a standardized category list for the classification of sound effects.

    Note: All of these sounds (and more!) are included in the 96 General Library.

  • [ATTENTION: This preview only simulates gameplay to demo a portion of the library’s content.]

    Plunge your players into the worlds of ancient Greece with ultra immersive mythology-themed sound effects and high quality win tunes for your slot game! With 310 top quality audio assets (155 original sounds), each one is handcrafted and optimized to be the perfect addition to your slot game, offering a massive value to players of any Greek Gods/Ancient Greece themed casino game!

    DOWNLOAD NOW and captivate your players from the first spin!

     

    ALL SLOT GAME SOUNDS INCLUDED

    Any sound needed for an immersive and engaging slot gameplay is included, so transform your project with this staggering collection of meticulously designed sounds! Whether you need any User Interface SFX – BUTTON SOUNDS, BET HIGH and BET LOW sounds, MINIMUM and MAXIMUM selection sounds, NOTIFICATIONS, TRIGGERS, REVEALS, REEL SPIN STARTS, REEL SPIN LOOPS, HUMS and WHOOSHES, simple and special ANTICIPATION REEL STOP sounds – or ZEUS, HERA, MEDUSA, POSEIDON and various Creatures Voice Overs and Sound Effects, Multi-Level WIN PAYOUT TUNES with and without COUNTER ROLLUPS, COIN SOUNDS, SYMBOL SOUNDS, anticipation-building WIND UPS, as well as BASE GAME (multi-level layered or full mix) MUSIC LOOPS, FREE GAMES/FEATURE MUSIC LOOPS, Sounds and Music for SUMMARIES and TRANSITIONS, they’re all here, offering you the perfect sound always within reach!


    GRAB ATTENTION, BUILD CONNECTION

    Whether your slot game is land-based or online, each asset has been painstakingly optimized to cut through the background chatter and immerse your players deep within any ancient Greece adventure like never before! Keep your players coming back for more with inviting sounds and catchy music that will grab their attention, reward play, and build long-lasting connection!


    INCREDIBLE EASE-OF-USE, INSTANT RESULTS

    Enrich your title in seconds with beautifully mixed, AAA quality sounds brought to you by our team of industry veterans, whose 1000 slot games worth of experience have culminated in this extraordinary sound pack! Each audio file is drag-and-drop ready, presented in high-quality MP3 and WAV formats with meticulously labeled keywords, so you can create the perfect gaming experience for your players in a matter of moments!

    For your convenience, we have included each asset in High-Quality WAV (44.1 kHz, 16 Bit) and MP3 (320 Kbps) formats.


    DOWNLOAD NOW and reward your players with this jackpot of music and sound effects that provides your game with any audio you could ever need!

     

    ANCIENT GREECE GODS SLOTS at a Glance:

    • 310 Audio Files (155 original sounds) – all in High Quality WAV and MP3 formats

    • Symbol Sounds, Buttons and other Interface Sounds, Reel Spin and Stops, Trigger Sounds, Selection and Reveal Sounds, and more!

    • Music Loops, Multiple Layering, Numerous Variations and Edits, Multiple Level Win Tunes, Payouts and other Celebration Tunes + much more!

    • Gods and Mythological Creatures Voice Overs and Sound Effects – Medusa, Zeus, Poseidon, Hera, Monster Roars and Screams, and more

    • Ready to use – requires no editing, labeling or splicing. Categorized, organized and individually labeled files for maximum use efficiency

     

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  • There’s always room for more Footsteps in your sound collection and this library offers you up 170+ recordings of male and female steps, skids, stops and jumps using a variety of footwear on several surfaces from dry treated Foley stages and natural environments such as household bathrooms and kitchens with room reverb.

    Footwear includes boots, sneakers, stilettos, platforms and slippers on carpets, concrete, tile wood and snow.

    We also included multiple isolated parquet flooring creaks to round off this extensive collection of fancy footwork.

 
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