Asbjoern Andersen


What's next for game audio? We got the chance to speak with Becky Allen - head of audio at PopCap/Electronic Arts, and keynote speaker at GameSoundCon - about just that. And here, she shares her insight on the current challenges, advancements, and future opportunities in the game audio industry:
Written by Jennifer Walden
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GameSoundCon is coming up quickly — Nov 7-8th in Los Angeles. The two-day conference explores tools and topics relevant to sound designing and composing for games, VR, and AR. This year’s keynote speaker is Becky Allen, head of audio at PopCap/Electronic Arts in Seattle, WA. She has over 20 years of experience in sound, composing and sound designing for companies like Microsoft, Soundelux Design Music Group, and PopCap Games —where she recently handled audio direction for Plants Vs. Zombies Heroes.

Allen doesn’t just simply work in the game audio industry. She also facilitates the expansion of the craft. Allen is a founding volunteer of the Audio Mentoring Project — a mentoring program in which game audio veterans use their extensive networks of contacts and industry experience to encourage the learning and development of less experienced members of the game audio industry.

Here, Allen shares her thoughts on GameSoundCon, as well as gives insight on current challenges, advancements, and opportunities in the game audio industry. Find out what she sees for the future of game audio.

 

What’s one advancement you’ve seen in game sound in the past year that you’re excited about?

Becky Allen has pink and blonde hair and sits in front of her workstationBecky Allen (BA): There’s a renewed focus on the importance of accurate 3D spatialization of audio through VR/AR and a lot of excitement around that. VR/AR is still the new frontier for audio and our fellow sound designers and creators are tackling new and interesting issues. I look forward to hearing their work as it advances.

Audio in VR/AR is a key and essential part to maintaining the illusion of a virtual world and if audio isn’t working well, the experience breaks. Because of this, we see more emphasis on the sound and its significance for this new platform.

 

What’s the biggest challenge for game audio at the moment? How do you see that resolved in the future? Tech wise, what would you want to see for game sound?

BA: Regardless of the size and scope, systems for delivering dynamic and captivating content are becoming more complex. The complexity of systems requires deeper understanding of scripting and at some points coding. These skills are becoming more important for a sound designer to develop.

Tech-wise, it’s the same that we have been developing for decades — more and better tools in the hands of the sound designers and composers. Our tools have made great advancements and we continue to drive these innovations through new ideas and creative desire.

GameSoundCon in Los Angeles, 7-8 November

Creatively, what would you like to see in the future for game sound?

BA: With the increased amount of data collection that we now see coming from gameplay, we are able to craft individual experiences for each player on a finer level. We can drive unique experiences for each player that is different, believable and compelling each time — much like our real-world experience. Creatively this opens up many possibilities for designers in all areas: sound design, music design, and voice.

 

You’re the first female keynote speaker at GameSoundCon. Can you tell us a little about that conference and why you would recommend it to your peers and newcomers to the industry?

BA: GameSoundCon (Nov 7 – 8, in Los Angeles) is a conference specifically for audio people. It’s a great conference to learn about new tools, share skills and knowledge, and also to network.

This is a smaller conference than GDC, which is wonderful but can be overwhelming. At this conference, you have more quality time with the participants and can really dig into deeper topics and have more substantial connections with individuals.

Also, to acknowledge your statement above, yes, I am delighted to be the first female keynote speaker and I hope the first of many.

 

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How is the game sound industry preparing for/handling the VR format (workflow, tools, staff skills)?

BA: I am not currently working in VR so I do not have first-hand experience with this. However, companies are emerging with new tools, new headphones, and new ways of listening. I find it intriguing that people are finding audio acoustic programs (Masters and PhD level) with an emphasis in psychoacoustics. Some of these students coming out of school with this knowledge now have a place to apply their education where perhaps before that wasn’t quite possible.

 

What opportunities do you hope VR will offer game sound pros?

BA: With the emphasis on the immersive experience being more pronounced, there are many opportunities for sound designers, in particular, to find a footing here.

More insights on the future of game audio:

 
Want to know more about what awaits in game audio? Be sure to check out the interviews with former Rockstar North audio director Matthew Smith here, and senior audio director/sound designer Ben Minto at EA DICE here.

Beyond VR and AR, any other major trends you’re seeing?

BA: Yes, culturally I see that corporations are now discussing and developing programs addressing gender gaps and diversity. I’m really happy to see these changes happening and being addressed.

However, change happens on all levels – individual to individual, within team groups at work, etc. True change of this kind is something that has to be looked at systemically as well as based on individual effort. I hope that we will continue to address the issues through discussion, initiatives, and conference roundtables, etc., until balance is attained (yes… an idealist!).

 

For game audio pros, how do you see the landscape changing in terms of job opportunities, must-have skills, platforms to focus on etc?

BA: The deeper and more complex systems that are being developed on all platforms suggest that sound designers, or any in-house audio person, have skills in scripting and coding as it applies to implementation. Knowledge in Python scripting, XML, and C++ are helpful but not currently considered a requirement. These skills and a person’s ability to “problem solve” through technological solutions and tool building are areas for growth and ways for young designers to focus and find more opportunity.

 

Do you have any advice for the next generation of game sound professionals? What should they be prepared for if they’re entering the industry in the next year?

BA: Immerse yourself in networking with local communities and connecting with other working professionals. You will find it a friendly and encouraging community. No need to be discouraged if you go to just one meet-up and nothing material seems to happen. Keep going and introduce yourself multiple times. The people in the industry remember when an individual continues to show up to networking events. It shows commitment and tenacity. People are prone to help individuals after they have seen you over the course of many networking events.

A big thanks to Becky Allen for all her great advice – and to Jennifer Walden for the interview!

 

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    The recordings contain sounds from 14 different species. With the focus on reptiles, it also features amphibians, mammals and birds.
    Ever needed a realistic hiss of an Arabian Cobra, the roar of a Nile crocodile, the sweet chirping of a Djungarian hamster, or the whistling sound of a Reticulated Phyton coming out of cold water? Here you go. With two mic positions in 192kHz I followed around the tails of big (Diamondback-) and small (Massasauga-) Rattlesnakes. I even recorded the purr of giant lizards (monitors).

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    These recordings are hard to come by and my mics were nearly hit by poison, that crystalizes and stays venomous for years to come as well as they got nearly eaten by a crocodile (was very scary indeed with me at the other end of the (way too short) boom pole)

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    Full List: Arabian Cobra, Diamondback Rattlesnake, Diamond Dove, Djungarian Hamster, Domestic Chicken, Domestic Goat, Nile Crocodile, Massasauga Rattler, Papua Monitor, Puff Adder, Reticulated Phyton, Ring Tailed Lemur, Yellow-Banded Poison Dart Frog and, well, a fish tank with my hydrophone with some weird electronic sounds from the heating.

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    The Take a seat library from Decal Audio is here to assist and brings you over 600 individual chair, sofa and bed sounds. The library is fully organised into actions covering, pick ups, put downs, sits, stands, scrapes and sweeteners, covering multiple chairs and multiple surfaces, providing a construction kit to allow for the tracklay of any number of different seating scenarios.

    We have also included some designed elements created utilising the sounds found in the library.
    All audio was captured in mono, 48kHz/24bit using a Rode NTG 3 directly into focusrite preamps or a Sound Devices MixPre.
  • Want that sound that’s made between the Optometrist asking if a or b is better? Want to hear what it sounds like when your eyes are being scanned and tested? Hear your glasses being adjusted before you get to wear them? The optometrist equipment library has all of this ready for you to use. This small boutique library covers a range of equipment used everyday to help optometrists figure out how well we see. Weather you’re using the machine noises to cut an optometrist scene or if you want to take the many mechanical sounds and design them into something other worldly it’s all there for you.

  • It’s Cold… It’s Dark… And the snow has frozen over…. Time To Shovel

    Driveway Ice Snow Shoveling is a collection of Shoveling Recordings and various ambiences taken while shoveling.

    Shovel Recordings recorded using the LOM UsI Pro Microphones feeding into the Zoom H1 Recorder, at 24 bit, 96kHz, clamped onto the shovel. Recordings include Digs, Scrapes, Scoops, Debris, Pokes, Stabs, and more!

    Ambience recordings recorded using the Sony D100 Recorder, at 24 it, 192kHz, at various positions. Recordings Include Distant Shoveling, Car Pass Bys, Icy and Crunchy!

    Stay in the nice warm house.
    All files are meta-data tagged using Soundly and Basehead.

    30 %
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    Ends 1591135199
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    Ends 1591135199
 
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