TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-01 Asbjoern Andersen


Go behind the sound of Amazon Studios' limited series The Underground Railroad with award-winning supervising sound editor/re-recording mixer Onnalee Blank, recordist Watson Wu, and foley artist Heikki Kossi.
Interview by Jennifer Walden, photos courtesy of Amazon Studios
Please share:

It’s not often that mainstream reviews mention the sound work on a show, but critic Brian Tallerico on RogerEbert.com did just that, calling out The Underground Railroad for having “one of the best sound designs in the history of television.”

WB Sound‘s 5x Emmy-winning and 6x CAS Award-winning re-recording mixer/supervising sound editor Onnalee Blank led the sound team on Barry Jenkins’ The Underground Railroad series for Amazon Prime Video. Based on Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, the show follows the harrowing journey of a young woman named Cora, who fights to escape slavery in the Deep South.

Blank began work early in the script phase by amassing a palette of potential sounds for possible directions the soundscape could take, creating on-set prop recording lists for production sound mixer Joe White, hiring renowned recordist Watson Wu to capture authentic ambiences and to record a steam train, working with award-winning sound designers like Harry Cohen, Jay Jennings, and Luke Gibleon, tapping talented foley supervisor/artist Heikki Kossi and his crew at H5 Film Sound in Finland, and mixing the show with long-time collaborator Mathew Waters (with whom she mixed Game of Thrones). The time and talent Blank and her team invested in the show ultimately makes for a powerful sonic experience.

Here, Blank, Wu, and Kossi share details on capturing, performing, designing, and crafting the soundtrack on The Underground Railroad.



The Underground Railroad - Official Trailer | Prime Video


The Underground Railroad – Official Trailer | Prime Video

When did you begin work on The Underground Railroad and who was your point person?

Onnalee Blank (OB): I’ve been working with Barry Jenkins (director/exec. producer) and Joi McMillon (editor) since Barry’s short film Chlorophyl, which was in 2011.

On The Underground Railroad, I started making a sound library during the early script phase. Getting Barry’s thinking for the sound of the show evolved from early script phase to our mixing stage.

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-02

Supervising sound editor/re-recording mixer Onnalee Blank

Then when he started shooting, I was watching dailies and writing down lists of certain props they were using on-set, and calling production sound mixer Joe White with a record list. Joe is amazing. He did a really fantastic job recording all the dialogue and he spent a lot of his own time recording specifics for me as well. It was too hard to fly down to the south and record during that time while creating a sound palette in Los Angeles. For instance, there was a certain typewriter they use in the show, so we got the sound of the exact typewriter. He did a great job of capturing all the carts, buggies, and some ambiences as well.

Joi McMillion (picture editor) started sending me early cuts of her scenes, so I started digging in and creating early sound edits. I created just basic backgrounds and effects to start with and sent them back so she could put them in her Avid. This way she would limit the use of any temp sound.

As far as the soundscape, how do you balance the beauty of what you’re seeing with the horror of the visual?

It was a good way for Joi and me to have a back and forth. We’d do a few passes — a few versions on the same scene — and it would change. We were trying to figure out what the palette of the sound is since each episode is so different.

As far as the soundscape, how do you balance the beauty of what you’re seeing with the horror of the visual? In the end, I said, “I think we’re making a horror movie. So what does horror sound like with naturalistic sounds that we can change to be something totally different?” It was a big challenge. I think, for every scene, we probably did 18 to 24 versions, at least.

It was a lot of work! But working for Barry Jenkins doesn’t feel like work because it is so rewarding.

It was great — just empowering everybody on the team to try anything they want to try. Anything.

Once episodes started to have a shape, I got my sound team involved and everybody brought so much to the table. It was great — just empowering everybody on the team to try anything they want to try. Anything.

They’d send it back and it was awesome because it would be stuff I wouldn’t think to do. Then I’d maybe try that with these other elements — take their ideas and marry it with some of this other stuff. The process became very collaborative with my team.

Barry really fought hard to get us time. Often, even on high-end TV work, it’s hard to get time for sound editorial. It really paid off because by the time we started mixing, we had every episode almost cut. We had what the sound of the show was going to be when we got to the mixing phase. Mixing just took the sound a step or two further into what the show actually became.
 

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-03

The proof is in the pudding. There are so many amazing sonic details, from the powerful ambiences to specific hard effects like lantern rattles to the subjective sounds. For instance in Ep. 2 “South Carolina,” Cora is taking the elevator up to visit the doctor and the sound of the elevator reflects the uneasiness and tension she’s feeling; even is this town, Griffin, that’s supposed to be ‘safe,’ she can’t relax…

OB: What’s great about that elevator sound is that I didn’t want to use any actual elevator sounds. My effects editor, Luke Gibleon, came up with only using train elements so the elevator would seem off in some way.

I agreed. I felt, “Let’s just make it our own thing. This is underground railroad, right?” Because then it sounds so different.

…we really internalized her mental state with our sound design.

Ep. 10 “Chapter 10: Mabel” was probably one of the episodes I worked on the longest. It’s all sound editorial and mixing. There’s hardly any music. It all takes place on the plantation in Cora’s mother’s perspective. Sheila Atim as Mabel does a phenomenal job acting with her eyes and we really internalized her mental state with our sound design.

Barry always pushes us to break what we have and try something new. Which is what Mabel was. We had a good palette to start with. I hired Recordist Watson Wu, who resides in Florida. Last year was when the 17-year cicadas were coming through the south, he camped out in the Everglades for three days and nights and captured all these sounds.

 

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-04

Watson, when did you start talking to Onnalee about the sort of sounds that she would want for The Underground Railroad and what did that list include?

Watson Wu (WW): In the beginning, she reached out to me and wanted ambient sounds of the Florida wilderness, far away from civilization, to simulate how it sounded back in the 1800s before automobiles. And so I did some research, talked to a friend of mine who’s a fishing Captain and one of his homes is near the Everglades. It’s no man’s land. He showed me on a Google map: go here, park here, jump over that gate and keep walking for miles and guaranteed, within 15 minutes of walking, you’re not going to hear anything.

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-05

Sound recordist Watson Wu

I followed Mike’s idea; I kept going. And sure enough, I was able to get literally half-hour takes without an aircraft. Wow. If I could get three minutes and 30 seconds of an ambience without traffic noise then I’m very happy. You can take that file and loop it because any scenes for a TV series or a movie typically aren’t going to be longer than a minute.

But I want to get longer takes. A half-hour take? That’s just wow. This place is great. It reminded me of Iceland; in certain areas I’d go four hours and not hear one single airplane or a car. It’s beautiful. It’s eerie actually because ears are always struggling to hear sounds. We’re used to being in the city, always hearing cars somewhere, always hearing somebody’s lawnmower, AC unit, or heater going off. So it was mind-blowing to hear very quiet sounds for that long.

It’s eerie actually because ears are always struggling to hear sounds.

Onnalee wanted daytime ambience, nighttime ambience, and if there was a strange sound from an insect or bird, to capture it. If there is foliage moving from wind, she wanted that — basically, just get everything that sounds interesting and eerie to use for the show because it has a lot of quiet moments.

She reached out to me right after summer, which isn’t ideal if you want crazy insects like we have in the summertime, especially in Florida. So we missed the cicadas. But I did capture quite a bit of ambient sounds, authentic wilderness sounds.

It’s kind of fortunate in a way because if I had gone during summer it would be mostly cicadas and nothing else. So it worked out. I was able to capture just one cricket by itself (because I don’t want crickets all the time). I captured mosquitoes and bees that were trying to get under the bug netting on my hat. There were some places where I couldn’t see in front of me because the swarm of mosquitoes was so thick. And the noise, wow! It was deafening.

Creating the music fro The Underground Railroad:

If you want the story behind The Underground Railroad‘s music, check out Soundworks Collection’s interview with two-time Oscar-nominated composer Nicholas Britell (Moonlight, If Beale Street Could Talk):



The Music for The Underground Railroad with Composer Nicholas Britell - Mix Sessions 2021


There were some places where I couldn’t see in front of me because the swarm of mosquitoes was so thick.

I wore long sleeves the entire time and had steel-toe waterproof boots in case something lunged at me. I’ve seen alligators, snakes, things with teeth. I brought a big machete with me and I used a mic stand as a potential weapon to defend myself. And I had to walk around the alligators. There were gators in the shallow water and gators on the road, too. And I had to walk around them. I could see them eyeballing me. There was one snake I came across and I could see it had a bulge because it just ate something, like a rat, and it lunged at me but it couldn’t move very far. I was ready. It was a water moccasin —extremely poisonous, extremely mean. So yeah, the things you do for sound!

I brought a big machete with me and I used a mic stand as a potential weapon to defend myself.

I also wore these Shure SE 846 earphones, which I’m so glad for because with the hat on you aren’t able to wear headphones. These are the best earphones. I can shoot certain rifles and handguns with these and still be protected and I can listen to what I’m shooting. These will let me hear very detailed sounds, quiet and loud, and protect my ears.

My friend Mike suggested that I borrow his mountain bike. With that, I was able to go 10 to 15 miles further into the wilderness to get clean sounds. For a trip like this, you have to be prepared. I’ve been out in the wilderness before, camping, and so I know how to deal with certain things and what to expect and look out for. Being able to plan and execute a trip like this, to be safe while you’re out there, is important.



The Underground Railroad - Ambience Recordings for the TV show


The Underground Railroad – Ambience Recordings for the TV show

It’s scary being in the Everglades at night. I brought a headlamp with me and a flashlight. It’s scary at night when you can’t see what’s going on, can’t see what you’re hearing. So I had to man up and just get out there and do it. I had to place my mics out there and keep watch. I was pointing flashlights at what I was hearing just in case. And I was able to capture the night ambience. The crickets were extremely loud. They performed well. And so all those night sounds were from the Everglades area.

Some places are so quiet that you have to be very good at keeping still and eventually you hit record and walk away (15 to 20-feet away) from the mic so you don’t have to do very shallow breathing — there were very quiet moments that I could feel myself breathing very shallowly — and you can move without getting those rustling sounds or your footstep in the recording.

… you want the entire experience and you want something specific. You want to get all of that at the same time.

I had a SoundField SPS200 ambisonic mic on a mic stand and I also had a Pearl MS8CL handheld mic, which is very sensitive. I could point it at very specific sources. So if there was a bird behind a bush, I could point the Pearl mic at it and get that sound while the ambisonic mic was collecting sound of the entire 360-degree area. That’s the thing, you want the entire experience and you want something specific. You want to get all of that at the same time.

Later on, actually, when the following year came, I offered to get the cicadas Onnalee wanted. So I reached out to K-Tek to get a 20-foot boom pole. And Tino Liberatore (Director of Sales) said, “What are you going to do with a 20-foot boom pole?”

I said, “I want to reach the trees. I want to get my mic up there next to a cicada and capture those sounds.”
And he’s like, “What?! We all avoid those sounds. And you want to capture the cicadas??”

I always avoid them because they ruin whatever you’re recording.

When I got the boom pole, I practiced with it first. You have to be very careful how you move the mic and how you hold the pole as to not create rumbling noise. So I went on my own to certain areas and walked around and got the pole way up there — struggling to keep it very still — to capture extremely loud cicadas. So when you hear the cicadas in the show, it was me right on them with a Sanken CO-100 K mic, which has a frequency range of 20 Hz to 100 kHz, so I was capturing at 32-bit/192 kHz really close on the cicadas.

With those high-fidelity recordings, they were able to create crazy sound design.

Learn more details about Waton’s recording adventure on ‘The Underground Railroad’:

Want more details on Watson Wu’s recordings for The Underground Railroad? Check out his blog post here

 

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-06

Right from the get-go, in Ep. 1 “Chapter 1: Georgia,” the cicadas and bugs in the ambience are so prominent and powerful….

OB: What’s great about that microphone, the Sanken CO-100 K, is if you crank the preamp up, it almost has this distortion quality to it, which is something that I really wanted to get.

We gave all these recordings to Harry Cohen, who was one of our other sound designers, and he morphed them and changed them.

One of the sound designers that worked on this project with us, Jay Jennings, said, “Crank this. It has a very unique tone.” So we were trying his input on this kind of recording style. We gave all these recordings to Harry Cohen, who was one of our other sound designers, and he morphed them and changed them. He also has a huge library of recordings.

We had 8 to 10 cricket effects tracks in 5.1 that we created, and we added a whole bunch of mono elements as well to create this 3D feel, like a depth of field, because if you just use stereo effects or if you just use 5.1s, then it just sits in the track. There’s no depth to it.

Effects re-recording mixer Mathew Waters did a good job of shaping those tracks, saying, “Okay, I need this. I need that. Okay, great. Let’s try this.”

…if you just use stereo effects or if you just use 5.1s, then it just sits in the track. There’s no depth to it.

Watson also captured the sounds of a steam train. One of the best recordings that he did on that steam train is he put the microphones down on the tracks and it had such a unique perspective; you could hear the train in a different way. That was the main recording that I used of the steam train. I morphed it to sound almost like wind or something, and created this huge low-end sound design element that we use throughout the series, especially in Ep. 10. It’s one of the most prominent sounds and people don’t even know it’s a train. It’s awesome.



The Underground Railroad - Steam Train recording session for the TV show


The Underground Railroad – Steam Train recording session for the TV show

 

Watson, can you talk about that steam train recording session? What did you capture and what was in your kit?

WW: I emailed this museum about my needs and they said, “You’re in luck; we have a steam train coming soon and you can rent it on a weekday when nobody is here. We have a 6-mile track.”

On the steam train itself, I had six channels going. I had two mics right above the steam engine, where the train engineer would stand shoveling coal into the firebox. I used the DPA 4061s because there’s basically no room to put bigger mics. I put the mics up high, at each far corner up top, pointed down and in toward where the firebox is located. I kept asking, “Are these areas safe? Can I wrap my cables here, and use zip-ties and gaffer’s tape?”

The engineer told me where I could and could not touch. I was able to use the Microdot cable to extend the cables. I kept my recorder up in the corner away from the floor because it’s really messy. If you’re going to record a steam train make sure to wear your ugliest, darkest clothing. Do not wear white or any light color because it’s messy.

I used a range of mics, from inexpensive to very expensive because they each have their own purposes.

I had a RØDE M1 handheld dynamic vocal mic right next to the smokestack. It was placed in front of the smokestack because, as the train moves forward, the steam is going backward, and that steam will destroy a mic. I had to use a lot of zip ties to keep it very still. It’s a very rough ride but that mic is a workhorse.

I put a Sennheiser E 935, another handheld dynamic vocal mic, right at the steam train’s air compressor to record any little hiss or sounds. That mic does a good job of capturing higher frequency sounds whereas the RØDE does a great job of capturing lower frequency sounds. I used a range of mics, from inexpensive to very expensive because they each have their own purposes.

I also had the Pearl MS8CL and a Rycote WS 10 windshield kit, which is just big enough to hold the mic. Anytime we had to do foley, I would just point that mic at whatever was happening.

It’s not as loud on the train as you’d think. It’s only when the safety valve pops open and you see the steam rising up, that’s when you hear a sound that’s really loud and high-pitched. I had to cover my ears when that happened or use my Shure earphones to protect myself.

The owner of the train, who was also operating the train, would warn me beforehand when that sound was coming. He knew from experience, just by hearing, that the safety valve was going to pop open and the steam was going to blow into the sky.

The size of the cars were different and so they had different sonic characteristics.

All the mics were going into a Zoom F6 recorder. I didn’t use the Sound Device recorder that I love to use because I didn’t want to get dirty. But I knew from my past sessions that the Zoom F6 would do a good job. It won’t work for all jobs, but for certain jobs, it does fantastic.

I took another Zoom F6 into a connected passenger car and had the SoundField SPS200 ambisonic mic inside a Rycote Cyclone on a Manfrotto 5001 B light stand — a nice, portable light stand with legs that can fold out completely flat. So I can put something heavy on the legs to keep it stabilized and keep it from falling over if there are jerky movements in the train car. And I zip-tied my mic stand to the seat so that it didn’t fall over during acceleration or deceleration of the train.

I was able to get the movement and rattling sounds inside the car without the steam train sound in those recordings. One of the cars was a Jim Crow car — a segregation car — and so I was able to record the white section by itself and then later on, the black section by itself. The size of the cars was different and so they had different sonic characteristics.

We were traveling at low speed, medium speed, and high speed and we got the sound of the windows rattling.

At a cleared area, I was able to step out to capture train pass-bys/whistles with a Sound Devices 788T-SSD recorder with Sennheiser 418s to track and Sennheiser 8040s in XY for panning left to right/ right to left to capture the moving train.

The two handheld recorders I placed between the tracks were an Olympus LS-11 and a Zoom H2n. The engineers were like, “Are you sure you want to do that??” And I said, “Heck Yeah!”

I like to capture as much as possible at one time because more is better.

I was recording in the connected cars at the same time that I was capturing the other sounds of the trains. And I was able to hang out by the track and get the pass-bys at the same time the on-boards were recording. I like to capture as much as possible at one time because more is better. During the editing, they’ll change scenes or re-do certain scenes. The beauty of recording so many sounds, so many tracks, at the same time is that you have options. If you just want the sound of the car going over the tracks without the engine, without the billowing of steam and the safety valve hiss, you have that option.

 


Popular on A Sound Effect right now - article continues below:


Trending right now:

  • A complete collection of sonic exploration by Slava Pogorelsky.
    Grow your sound arsenal with an ever evolving collection of high-end cinematic and fresh sound effects!
    Here’s what to expect:

    RESONATING METAL FORCE offers a fresh sound palette of reverberant aggressive metal rampage, totaling 680 sound effects. Featuring creeping evolving metal pressure and resonating rattle, massive rumble, explosive impacts and nerve-racking squeaks.
    HORROR SERIES VOL.1: EVIL STRINGS TORTURED WIRES offers a unique toolset for nightmarish designs, totaling 564 sound effects. Featuring creeping dread of bowed metal wires, strings and double bass, providing exciting opportunities for unique layering.
    CINEMATIC MAGICAL ICE is offering a unique toolset for ice-cold freezing designs, totaling 267 sound effects. Great for fantasy genre with ice based magic, motion graphics, time lapse and flow motion freeze sequences.
    CINEMATIC WATER WHOOSHES AND TEXTURES is offering a unique toolset for water and underwater designs, totaling 285 sounds. Great for hyper realistic designs, water based magic, surreal underwater movement or motion graphics with liquid elements.
    CINEMATIC WOOD SYMPHONY is offering a variety of wood based recordings that were morphed into a unique audio experience that bends the boundaries between recognisable source and unusual wooden textures, totaling 611 sound effects.
    SCI – FI ELEMENTS VOL.1 is offering a variety of carefully crafted futuristic sound effects that vary from pleasant and musical to unpredicted and glitchy, totaling 364 sound effects.
    CINEMATIC METAL WHOOSHES is offering a unique collection of aggressive roaring metal whooshes and transitions with cinematic feel and mind bending characteristics, totaling 120 sound effects.

    WHAT SOUND PROFESSIONALS SAY:

    Victor Mercader – AAA Sound Designer (Apex Legends)
    “I find myself continuously using Slava’s SFX libraries to blend it’s pristine and detailed sound designs into my own sounds. They always add that cutting edge I am missing and make my sound designs more unique and pristine. The Sci-fi Elements sound library is the perfect library to use and blend into my UI designs in Apex Legends.”

    Enos Desjardins – Sound Designer/Sound Effects Editor (Mission: Impossible – Dead Reckoning, Black Mirror)
    “Slava has been creating some really cool libraries which I find myself using time and again. Really high quality recordings to start with but then the cool processing he has used for example in his cinematic whoosh libraries really stand out. They are not just your standard generic whoosh sounds but are loaded with character and have a unique feel to them that is really fresh and cuts through in the nicest of ways.”

    Bjørn Jacobsen – AAA Sound Designer (CyberPunk 2077, HITMAN, DARQ)
    “Slava has for several years made high quality sound effects for me to play with. I use his sound libraries across multiple projects as lego blocks of my creations.”
     
    Yarron Katz – AAA Composer and Sound Designer
    “Slava makes some wonderful libraries. He’s relatively new on the scene and his libraries have come to critical acclaim. He takes some general ideas, like whooshes and he injects some extremely revolutionary and innovative ideas to them, so you’re not getting another whoosh library – you’re getting something very unique, very fresh. He brings some wonderful ideas to the table.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “‘Evil Strings Tortured Wires’ is an all-scary affair with plenty of really good, nightmarish, imaginative sounds from authentic materials, like double bass, dulcimer strings and metal wires. Sound-wise, this sample pack is clean and carefully recorded. The editing and processing of sounds is top notch, with sound design techniques applied very professionally. Overall, very gritty and not for the faint of heart.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “As far as the sound goes ‘Cinematic Magical Ice’ is both beautiful and mystical. I happen to like the icy textures that are oozing with coldness. Overall, this sound library boasts a good variety of effect samples ready to drop in various cinematic projects.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “The spotlight of ‘Cinematic Wood Symphony’ is the wide range of complex sounds that can be dropped in your sound design projects. I love the Wood Movement and Tonal sounds, and I’m sure thriller and horror music composers will be delighted with the Friction and Impact sounds. If your cinematic projects are lacking texture and impact sounds ‘Cinematic Wood Symphony’ is a library to be considered – especially if you’re looking beyond common wood sounds.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Cinematic Water Whooshes and Textures is great for anything. You won’t be hearing recordings of calm rivers or relaxing streams, but cinematic whooshes and textures for soundtrack works and media projects. Whether you’re into this type of sounds, this pack was recorded quite well, professionally edited and processed with Slava’s own flair.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Slava is back with another aggressive and energetic sample library called Resonating Metal Force – a 680 strong collection of modern metal effects captured using various tools and high-end studio equipment. The source material was edited and processed professionally for instant use. These sounds are primed for experimentation – whether you add your unique processing, layer several WAV samples or slice and dice to your heart’s content, the sky’s the limit. This sound pack is another winner.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Sound-wise, the quality of ‘Cinematic Metal Whooshes’ is clear and punchy, and very consistent from start to finish. The whole content promises to be a tool to get you going in your cinematic adventures – and it delivers.”

    50 %
    OFF
    Ends 1719266399
  • Human Sound Effects Crowds: Emotions And Reactions Play Track 400 sounds included, 90 mins total $39.50

    This SFX library contains a wide range of reactions and emotional responses varying from quiet crowds to roared battle cries to a large selection of exclamations generated by a group of passionate theatrical actors in indoor venues.

    Apart from the vocalizations, we’ve also included recordings of more unusual crowd ambiances like people walking around the mics, falling down, sitting down and getting up, jumping around, marching, or just being present in the space.

    Crowds library is split into the following two parts:

    Small Groups: Includes small groups of up to 30 people which you can layer together and quickly create the sound of any sized realistic groups of people.

    Large Crowds: Brings pre-designed, easy-to-use sounds of medium to large crowds in various types of reactions, moods, and surroundings.

    50 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718575199
  • Electricity Sound Effects A Fluorescent Bulb II Play Track 12+ sounds included, 37 mins total $25

    This library is a continuation of my first library A Fluorescent Bulb. This contains 6 more fluorescent light hums/buzzes with nice plinks and warming sounds. For each light there is at least 2 minutes up to 5 minutes of tone, and a second file with a manipulated light switch where you get multiple plinks and buzzes. The tone of this library is a bit higher pitch than the first 6 bulbs from the first library

    29 %
    OFF
  • Game Audio Packs Mobile Game Play Track 578 sounds included, 30 mins total $42

    Inspired by app market hits like Clash of Clans and Candy Crush, we present to you Mobile Game – a truly fun and genuinely gameplay inspired sound effects library. Filled with a thorough selection of popular game ready audio assets, Mobile Game gives you sounds that you can quickly implement inside any game to give it a familiar “hit app” game feel.

    • Includes 578 files
    • All files in .Wav 96k 24bit
    • Plus game ready mp3 files
    • Inspired by today’s best App Games
    • Includes Soundminer metadata
    • 891.9 MB of samples

    Mobile Game features sounds such as:

    Bubbles • Building • Coins • Crafting • Mechanisms and Contraptions • Musical Stabs • Objective Completes • Pick Ups • Potions • Tonal Designed Organic fx • UI/Menu • Upgrades

    14 %
    OFF

Latest releases:

  • Presenting the most malfunctioning, dirty old gritty sounding engine failure library out there

    Featuring a staggering 81 files with numerous takes in most tracks, the Kaput sound effects library will cover the bases of almost any broken false starting engine scene one can imagine.

    I can honestly say, that finding the vehicles and tools for this library, has been among the most challenging I have come by. Old and broken cars and trucks are hard to come by these days. Most cars are obviously either driving and dont have start problems, and many of the rest just wont start at all.

    Just as rare are broken petrol powered tools, which usually fit the latter category of not working at all.

    Still, with amazing recording help from recordist Michal Fojcik Soundmind Poland, and just as amazing help from recordist Erik Watland from Norway, the Kaput sound effects library is featuring no less then

    24 different cars, trucks, moped and motorcycles

    1 boat engine

    A few weird sounding power generators and water pump motors

    Back firing exhausts

    Petrol powered garden tools, chain saws, and hedge trimmers

    Brutal construction machines

    From old eastern european trucks, vintage US V8 muscle trucks, classic scandinavian cars, and more modern diesel and petrol engines to funny sputtering dying petrol power tools.

    There is even a few more recording sessions planned, that just didn’t make the deadline for the first batch of sounds in this library (buying a copy of this first of sounds, will of course make any future sounds added to the library free of charge).

    KAPUT is 81 stereo and mono files, 96/24. 1,6 gb big, all UCS ready!

  • Hear the majesty of tropical seas from soothing surf, trickling water laps, and crashing wave sound effects.

  • ACOUSTIC GUITAR FOLEY FOR YOUR PROJECTS
    The SB111 ACOUSTIC GUITAR FOLEY Sound Effects Library is a collection of handling movements, grabs and sets, string noise, drags, impacts, strumming, fingerpicking, tuning, and the smashing and destroying of an acoustic guitar.

    A UNIQUE ACOUSTIC GUITAR FOLEY LIBRARY
    We’ve gone above and beyond just capturing the sounds of strumming and picking – we’ve recorded the nuances and details that make acoustic guitars so special. Like the subtle sounds of the guitar strap as it settles against your shoulder, string noise of fingers on the fretboard, the satisfying sound of the guitar being tuned, grabs and set downs, strings being clipped and even a full restringing sequence. Of course we’ve also included the playing of chords and riffs while strumming and fingerpicking – some played in tune and some out of tune. We did not forget to record your pick as it rattles around in the abyss of the guitar’s sound hole – and the satisfying sound of the guitar being smashed and destroyed. All the details you need to bring realism to your project.

    20 %
    OFF
    Ends 1719525599
  • The Drawers & Cupboards SFX library is an essential collection for professionals seeking high-quality sound effects for their projects. This library features 63 meticulously recorded sounds of opening, closing, and rummaging through cupboards and drawers, making it perfect for game developers, animators, and filmmakers.

    This library offers a diverse range of sounds, including:

    • Opening and closing cupboard doors
    • Picking up glass bottles
    • Rummaging through various materials (glass, mixed materials, containers, plastic)
    • Metal and wooden drawers opening and closing
  • Car Sound Effects Broken Car Engine Play Track 5 sounds included, 28 mins total $27

    My car engine broke! As a result of making a huge costly mistake caused by accidentally skipping an oil change service from getting dates and miles mixed up (on top of being a higher milage car), my 2006 Volvo V50 T5’s engine starting making incredibly loud knocking, clicking and rattling sounds. Took it for one last drive before it was picked up by a junk yard, and recorded the process. I put a DPA 4061 and a Rode NT5 in the engine and drove it around the neighborhood, first on residential streets, then drove it harder on some faster streets (the engine was so loud you can’t hear any other cars in the recordings), abusing the manual mode for higher rpm recordings the whole time until it started overheating, smoking and dumping liquid (coolant I think? Oil? Both?). I Quickly took the DPA out because it was right near a section of the engine that was overheating, but I left the NT5 in. Satisfied with what I recorded but still a couple miles from home, after my car cooled a bit I continued to record my drive home, this time with the DPA inside the car to get an interior perspective (this drive is labeled “bonus drive” in the library).

    This library is just 5 files, totaling 27 minutes and 28 seconds, 24/96k, 956MB. Quality Soundminer metadata and UCS compliant. Recorded with a DPA 4061 and NT5 for starts, idles, off, revving, slow to moderate driving, harder faster driving, with lots of variation. One file is just the NT5 engine recording for an additional 5 and a half minute drive, and one is just the DPA for an interior perspective of that drive.

    I’ll miss that car a lot, but at least I got some great recordings out of it! I hope you find them useful.

SUPERDEALS - don't miss these:

  • Coll Anderson ‘s famed Battle Crowds library is the world’s largest collection of battle crowd sound effects, covering huge crowds as they’re deep in battle, celebrating and cheering, screaming, yelling, protesting, begging, crying and much more, as well as troop movements and marching through fields, forests, and around buildings, individual call-outs, marching and more. If you’re looking for the ultimate collection of battle crowd sounds for huge clashes, civil unrest and protests, or smaller skirmishes – captured from multiple perspectives – this is it!

    This special version brings you both the Battle Crowds Core and Add-On libraries in one powerful bundle.

    50 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718488799
  • Ambisonic Sound Effects Room Tone Play Track 60 sounds included, 311 mins total From: $109 From: $79

    Sound Tailor Effects Library enters the void with its 3rd release:

    60 sounds, 5+ hours of rich and deep room tones, with a variety of sizes and environments that will cover most of sound editors needs. From a quiet residential bedroom to an reverberant inactive hospital hall, a ventilated office space, or a noisy basement, we carefully chose the right place at the right time, to get the best from those empty spaces.

    We’ve recorded with a combination of 7 low noise microphones, 1 ambisonic microphone and 1 geophone, dispatched on a wide rig, to get the best spatial impression, allowing us to deliver a true 7.1.2 format, plus ambisonic, 5.1 and 2.1 versions. The sub channel, provided by the geophone and its low frequency response, has been a shocking surprise for us, and is a real colorful and creative addition.

    You can choose between several spatial format combinations, to suit your needs. All versions includes a stereo mixdown, and all files are loopable.

    Sound Tailor’s Room Tones is UCS compliant, and delivered in high resolution 96kHz/24 Bits.

    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718920799
    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718920799
    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718920799
    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718920799
    28 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718920799
    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718920799
  • A complete collection of sonic exploration by Slava Pogorelsky.
    Grow your sound arsenal with an ever evolving collection of high-end cinematic and fresh sound effects!
    Here’s what to expect:

    RESONATING METAL FORCE offers a fresh sound palette of reverberant aggressive metal rampage, totaling 680 sound effects. Featuring creeping evolving metal pressure and resonating rattle, massive rumble, explosive impacts and nerve-racking squeaks.
    HORROR SERIES VOL.1: EVIL STRINGS TORTURED WIRES offers a unique toolset for nightmarish designs, totaling 564 sound effects. Featuring creeping dread of bowed metal wires, strings and double bass, providing exciting opportunities for unique layering.
    CINEMATIC MAGICAL ICE is offering a unique toolset for ice-cold freezing designs, totaling 267 sound effects. Great for fantasy genre with ice based magic, motion graphics, time lapse and flow motion freeze sequences.
    CINEMATIC WATER WHOOSHES AND TEXTURES is offering a unique toolset for water and underwater designs, totaling 285 sounds. Great for hyper realistic designs, water based magic, surreal underwater movement or motion graphics with liquid elements.
    CINEMATIC WOOD SYMPHONY is offering a variety of wood based recordings that were morphed into a unique audio experience that bends the boundaries between recognisable source and unusual wooden textures, totaling 611 sound effects.
    SCI – FI ELEMENTS VOL.1 is offering a variety of carefully crafted futuristic sound effects that vary from pleasant and musical to unpredicted and glitchy, totaling 364 sound effects.
    CINEMATIC METAL WHOOSHES is offering a unique collection of aggressive roaring metal whooshes and transitions with cinematic feel and mind bending characteristics, totaling 120 sound effects.

    WHAT SOUND PROFESSIONALS SAY:

    Victor Mercader – AAA Sound Designer (Apex Legends)
    “I find myself continuously using Slava’s SFX libraries to blend it’s pristine and detailed sound designs into my own sounds. They always add that cutting edge I am missing and make my sound designs more unique and pristine. The Sci-fi Elements sound library is the perfect library to use and blend into my UI designs in Apex Legends.”

    Enos Desjardins – Sound Designer/Sound Effects Editor (Mission: Impossible – Dead Reckoning, Black Mirror)
    “Slava has been creating some really cool libraries which I find myself using time and again. Really high quality recordings to start with but then the cool processing he has used for example in his cinematic whoosh libraries really stand out. They are not just your standard generic whoosh sounds but are loaded with character and have a unique feel to them that is really fresh and cuts through in the nicest of ways.”

    Bjørn Jacobsen – AAA Sound Designer (CyberPunk 2077, HITMAN, DARQ)
    “Slava has for several years made high quality sound effects for me to play with. I use his sound libraries across multiple projects as lego blocks of my creations.”

    Stefan Kovatchev – Audio Director (MultiVersus)
    “Slava has put together an impressive collection of high quality source assets, recorded cleanly, and at high sample rates. It’s always refreshing to find a new purveyor of good source material. I particularly enjoyed Resonating Metal Force, which is comprised of very useable, unique tonal textures and impacts.”

    Samuel Gagnon-Thibodeau – Sound Designer/Sound Effects Editor (Dream Scenario, The Watchers, Hunting Daze)
    “Slava’s Cinematic Wood Symphony detailed textures and movements blend so well in what I’m usually looking for in terms of sound design. It really brings proximity and sensitivity to the action while feeling real and natural. The creative blend of the wooden sounds with whooshes and impacts also makes them very unique. I’m finding myself coming back to them more and more as they fit in many situations.”
     
    Yarron Katz – AAA Composer and Sound Designer
    “Slava makes some wonderful libraries. He’s relatively new on the scene and his libraries have come to critical acclaim. He takes some general ideas, like whooshes and he injects some extremely revolutionary and innovative ideas to them, so you’re not getting another whoosh library – you’re getting something very unique, very fresh. He brings some wonderful ideas to the table.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “‘Evil Strings Tortured Wires’ is an all-scary affair with plenty of really good, nightmarish, imaginative sounds from authentic materials, like double bass, dulcimer strings and metal wires. Sound-wise, this sample pack is clean and carefully recorded. The editing and processing of sounds is top notch, with sound design techniques applied very professionally. Overall, very gritty and not for the faint of heart.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “As far as the sound goes ‘Cinematic Magical Ice’ is both beautiful and mystical. I happen to like the icy textures that are oozing with coldness. Overall, this sound library boasts a good variety of effect samples ready to drop in various cinematic projects.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “The spotlight of ‘Cinematic Wood Symphony’ is the wide range of complex sounds that can be dropped in your sound design projects. I love the Wood Movement and Tonal sounds, and I’m sure thriller and horror music composers will be delighted with the Friction and Impact sounds. If your cinematic projects are lacking texture and impact sounds ‘Cinematic Wood Symphony’ is a library to be considered – especially if you’re looking beyond common wood sounds.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Cinematic Water Whooshes and Textures is great for anything. You won’t be hearing recordings of calm rivers or relaxing streams, but cinematic whooshes and textures for soundtrack works and media projects. Whether you’re into this type of sounds, this pack was recorded quite well, professionally edited and processed with Slava’s own flair.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Slava is back with another aggressive and energetic sample library called Resonating Metal Force – a 680 strong collection of modern metal effects captured using various tools and high-end studio equipment. The source material was edited and processed professionally for instant use. These sounds are primed for experimentation – whether you add your unique processing, layer several WAV samples or slice and dice to your heart’s content, the sky’s the limit. This sound pack is another winner.”

    50 %
    OFF
    Ends 1719266399
  • The whole 9 yards.
    Comprised of seven heavy hitting libraries, this bundle includes INTERACTIVE, SCI FI, GEARBOX, SORCERY, HERO, BROKEN, and MELEE. Save by bundling all SEVEN in a single library.

    GEARBOX:
    Boutique analog mechanical contraptions, steampunk gadgetry, gizmos and machines big and small.


    SORCERY
    Spells, deflects, casts, blocks, beams, and more. Unrivaled wizardry at your fingertips.


    BROKEN:
    Car crashes, explosions, crumbling buildings, earthquakes, ripping earth and metal, to debris, and more.


    HERO:
    HERO – Sword fights, stabbing, guillotines, impaling, battle cries, shields, drawbridges, armor, foley and more.


    MELEE:
    Punches, kicks, blocks, bodyfalls, grabs, slaps, bone breaks, blood splatters, and more.


    SCI Fi:
    Spaceships, machines, mechanicals, weapons and more. Technologies exceeding your boldest visions of the future.


    Interactive:
    The ultimate Game UI SFX library including clicks, pops, whooshes, musical and tonal elements, and ready to use designs for every UI action and game style.


    40 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718575199
Need specific sound effects? Try a search below:


TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-07

Onnalee, you talked about taking a horror film approach for this series, and that whip sound is certainly ‘horrific.’ It’s brutal and visceral. There are so many sounds like that in The Underground Railroad that are very specific and particular, like the hand-forged chains, metal levers, all the creaky floors and doors in Arnold’s childhood home and the bellows in the forge in Ep. 4, and all those great lantern sounds. Did you have specific recording sessions for that?

OB: The bellows sound comes back later in the other part of Ep. 5, where it’s decrepit and hardly works and it’s rusty. The bellows for the fire was definitely a very unique sound. It’s something you don’t see every day in modern times. That sound wasn’t captured on set. That was all created after the fact. Foley did some, sound effects did some, and sound design. With all of those combinations, we created this sound altogether with the rope and the chain, the creaks and the rust sound, and the heavy squeak — those make it have a very unique sound that comes up later.

The bellows for the fire was definitely a very unique sound.

We used Heikki Kossi in Finland to do our foley. He and his crew at H5 Film Sound are amazing.

We knew Ep. 3 “Chapter 3: North Carolina” was going to be a challenging one for foley because Cora and Grace are up in the attic and it’s this two-part attic so we wanted to have the lower part of the attic feel totally different than the upper part. Heikki built a little space in his foley room that he got inside and moved wood around and created the whole feel of this attic. I said, “I want the walls to breathe. I want everything. Does it have a metal roof? Can you create that sound? I want wind on a metal roof. Can you record that?” And he was game.

He did a great job of creating ‘background foley.’ He’s really, really good at that. I never worked with Heikki until this job. And so it was really nice to figure out what his expertise are and that is definitely one of them. His whole process is different from the people in the States. He covered everything — stuff you wouldn’t think foley would cover, like wind in trees, creaks, and all of his water foley was really excellent.

 

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-08

Special platform created for attic foley at H5 Film Sound

Heikki, can you talk about your approach to foley on The Underground Railroad? What were some your biggest challenge in terms of foley? And what were some of your unique setups for this show?

Heikki Kossi (HK): Starting on The Underground Railroad was interesting because I started with the last episode without seeing any of the earlier episodes. Of course, we had creative talks with Onnalee about what was to come.

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-09

Foley Artist Heikki Kossi

I got a strong impression of the aesthetics of the series even though I started with the last episode. And during the process, I noticed that the instinct I followed was right. For example, I worked on Ep. 6 “Tennessee – Proverbs” without knowing what will happen on Ep. 4 “The Great Spirit” or Ep. 9 “Indiana – Winter.” I just had some special feeling about Ridgeway’s relation to the blacksmith’s workplace. I felt that there was something dark in that place and I felt like doing some of the metal sounds in a way that’s very creepy and ugly. The visuals were so inspiring and at the same, I followed my gut.

I felt that there was something dark in that place and I felt like doing some of the metal sounds in a way that’s very creepy and ugly.

For me, the most important thing is the performance — acting with sound. The Underground Railroad is full of amazing acting. Even when the characters don’t do anything overt there are so many motives for foley, especially for off-screen. And there was a lot of that on this show. Onnalee was looking for different textures for the locations and buildings. Those off-screen ambiences (background foley) are something you just need to skip quite often because there is not time for that but with this one there was time.

For example, in Ep. 3 “Chapter 3: North Carolina” Onnalee wanted to create different feeling of the house where Cora and Grace were hiding in the attic. So I carefully spotted all three floors. For the first and second floors, I recorded in the room with natural reverb but using different pits. The first one is more solid and the second one is more hollow. And I created different creaks for every floor.

The attic was recorded in a normal “dry” foley room to make it more intimate. Also, I was using pits that I’ve made from 80-year-old or even 200-year-old wood. It has a totally different sound.

I was using pits that I’ve made from 80 year old or even 200 year old wood. It has a totally different sound.

Then I asked Onnalee what kind of roof there was because, when I performed foley, I haven’t yet seen the episodes that showed the type of roofing on the houses. So for the attic, I created two takes of metal roof rattling for the left and right sides, and also metal creaks and wooden creaks. For the first and second floor only, I created wooden creaks. So that was the way to make the walls breath and to create a special sonic experience of the place.

When I’m recording these sounds for the background, at the same time I’m listening to the temp tracks with dialogue, effects and music in one ear. Then, my performance is like a jam session with the foley elements. It’s almost like playing in the band. Of course, I’m performing to picture because there is so much information and motive for the color of the sound and the rhythm of what I see in the image. I just try to follow the characters’ movement and reactions, especially what’s happening with their eyes.



Master Foley Artist Heikki Kossi performs footsteps for 'The Underground Railroad'


Foley Artist Heikki Kossi performs footsteps for ‘The Underground Railroad’

My goal is to follow the story. I really enjoy that. This is a totally different world compared to, for example, walking on-screen steps where you just need to be in hard sync with the exact performance, which is an enjoyable and important part of the job.

It’s always hard to say exactly what is challenging and what is easy. The Underground Railroad was just full of small details with everything. And while doing all those things, you just need to be aware of the textures and your own feelings. Sometimes it’s hard. But it’s also rewarding.

In regards to special setups, for the attic I raised the pit one meter high and put one microphone under the pit to capture more hollowness. I also used the same method for when Cora and Grace hear steps off-screen from the other floors.

As for the mics, we used the Neumann KMR81 and AKG C414. For the crunchy stone footsteps in the underground railroad tunnel, we mainly used a Shure KSM313/NE Ribbon mic.

 

[tweet_box]Behind the Harrowing Sound of ‘The Underground Railroad'[/tweet_box]

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-10

Going back to Ep. 5 “Chapter 5: Tennessee,” which was set in the eerie burned-out woods of Tennessee, can you talk about creating that ambience? You can’t just go out and set the woods on fire to record it, right?

OB: Barry actually did for the shoot. There was a controlled fire while they were shooting. Some of this was enhanced, but a lot of those trees that you see burning are controlled burns.

There was a controlled fire while they were shooting.

That was a question. I kept asking, “Is there going to be more fire?”

But Barry said nope. This is what it is.

It was actually more challenging to create a subtle fire than having it be a forest fire. And it ebbs and flows. How can you make fire interesting when it lasts for almost two hours?

Jay Jennings poured his heart into these episodes; these were his babies and he did a fantastic job. His sound design theme that he created used anvil hits and clocks, and it’s almost like Arnold Ridgeway’s time is running out; you’ll notice that it really pays off towards the end of season.

 

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-11

As for the score, it’s not constant. There are moments where it’s just sound design and then the music would slip in so subtly. It was beautifully done! Was the score crafted that way?

OB: Composer Nicholas Britell and I have worked together a few times and we’ve really gotten into a great working relationship. It’s nice for a sound designer and composer to really communicate. We would talk once a week, sometimes about the different stuff he was doing.

It’s nice for a sound designer and composer to really communicate.

I’d ask, “What episode are you working on right now?” I would talk to him about scenes that I’ve covered pretty heavily in musical sound design. Because there was a big balance of elements that were like score that we were creating. And certain times he had stuff in the same place. And I’d say, “I’ve got to mute all this stuff. I’m going to play this and I’m going to change my sound design to match your key. You’re in D major flat so let’s change our stuff to that.” And vice versa.

He said, “Hey, I need fire sounds. Can you create some forest fire sounds and trees? I want to implement that into my score.” So I’d create something and send it to him and then he’d write that stem in his score.
Sometimes it was interesting on the mix stage; Mat [Waters], mixing the effects would ask, “Where’s that fire coming from?” It was in the score!

So it was a balance of that as well. I’d say 95% of the time, Nick and I already figured out what’s score and what’s sound design and Barry was a big part of that too. He loves sound in general, and loves having a rich soundtrack.

I’d say 95% of the time, Nick and I already figured out what’s score and what’s sound design and Barry was a big part of that too.

The fact that it does meld so nicely was great. And Barry likes that. He doesn’t like things to pop in and off unless it’s intended to be that way. So how can we make those lines beautiful?

 

TheUndergroundRailroad_sound-12

You mentioned mixing this with Mathew Waters. So you were handling dialogue and music and he was on effects?

OB: That’s correct. I don’t sound supervise that much, so when I do I put my heart and soul into it. I don’t like to mix my own material. I really like to have a different perspective on that. And sometimes I’m like, “What’s going on over there? Why did you mute that?” And Mat’s like, “Oh, because this…”

Everything is for the benefit of the project, which makes for a great mixing experience.

Mathew Waters and I have been working together for a long time. If he mutes one of my sounds, I don’t go into a ball and cry or get pissed off. Everything is for the benefit of the project, which makes for a great mixing experience.

I mean, every once in a while…

No, I’m kidding! It’s a good back and forth, you know? That’s probably why the mix sounds the way it does, because I’m like, “Take that out. Move that around.” And he’s like,”What’s going on with music over there? Can you look at that?” There’s no dancing around what we really feel and what the other person is doing.
 

A big thanks to Onnalee Blank, Watson Wu, and Heikki Kossi for giving us a behind-the-scenes look at the sound of The Underground Railraod and to Jennifer Walden for the interview!

 

Please share this:


 



 
 
THE WORLD’S EASIEST WAY TO GET INDEPENDENT SOUND EFFECTS:
 
A Sound Effect gives you easy access to an absolutely huge sound effects catalog from a myriad of independent sound creators, all covered by one license agreement - a few highlights:

  • Human Sound Effects Crowds: Emotions And Reactions Play Track 400 sounds included, 90 mins total $39.50

    This SFX library contains a wide range of reactions and emotional responses varying from quiet crowds to roared battle cries to a large selection of exclamations generated by a group of passionate theatrical actors in indoor venues.

    Apart from the vocalizations, we’ve also included recordings of more unusual crowd ambiances like people walking around the mics, falling down, sitting down and getting up, jumping around, marching, or just being present in the space.

    Crowds library is split into the following two parts:

    Small Groups: Includes small groups of up to 30 people which you can layer together and quickly create the sound of any sized realistic groups of people.

    Large Crowds: Brings pre-designed, easy-to-use sounds of medium to large crowds in various types of reactions, moods, and surroundings.

    50 %
    OFF
    Ends 1718575199
  • A complete collection of sonic exploration by Slava Pogorelsky.
    Grow your sound arsenal with an ever evolving collection of high-end cinematic and fresh sound effects!
    Here’s what to expect:

    RESONATING METAL FORCE offers a fresh sound palette of reverberant aggressive metal rampage, totaling 680 sound effects. Featuring creeping evolving metal pressure and resonating rattle, massive rumble, explosive impacts and nerve-racking squeaks.
    HORROR SERIES VOL.1: EVIL STRINGS TORTURED WIRES offers a unique toolset for nightmarish designs, totaling 564 sound effects. Featuring creeping dread of bowed metal wires, strings and double bass, providing exciting opportunities for unique layering.
    CINEMATIC MAGICAL ICE is offering a unique toolset for ice-cold freezing designs, totaling 267 sound effects. Great for fantasy genre with ice based magic, motion graphics, time lapse and flow motion freeze sequences.
    CINEMATIC WATER WHOOSHES AND TEXTURES is offering a unique toolset for water and underwater designs, totaling 285 sounds. Great for hyper realistic designs, water based magic, surreal underwater movement or motion graphics with liquid elements.
    CINEMATIC WOOD SYMPHONY is offering a variety of wood based recordings that were morphed into a unique audio experience that bends the boundaries between recognisable source and unusual wooden textures, totaling 611 sound effects.
    SCI – FI ELEMENTS VOL.1 is offering a variety of carefully crafted futuristic sound effects that vary from pleasant and musical to unpredicted and glitchy, totaling 364 sound effects.
    CINEMATIC METAL WHOOSHES is offering a unique collection of aggressive roaring metal whooshes and transitions with cinematic feel and mind bending characteristics, totaling 120 sound effects.

    WHAT SOUND PROFESSIONALS SAY:

    Victor Mercader – AAA Sound Designer (Apex Legends)
    “I find myself continuously using Slava’s SFX libraries to blend it’s pristine and detailed sound designs into my own sounds. They always add that cutting edge I am missing and make my sound designs more unique and pristine. The Sci-fi Elements sound library is the perfect library to use and blend into my UI designs in Apex Legends.”

    Enos Desjardins – Sound Designer/Sound Effects Editor (Mission: Impossible – Dead Reckoning, Black Mirror)
    “Slava has been creating some really cool libraries which I find myself using time and again. Really high quality recordings to start with but then the cool processing he has used for example in his cinematic whoosh libraries really stand out. They are not just your standard generic whoosh sounds but are loaded with character and have a unique feel to them that is really fresh and cuts through in the nicest of ways.”

    Bjørn Jacobsen – AAA Sound Designer (CyberPunk 2077, HITMAN, DARQ)
    “Slava has for several years made high quality sound effects for me to play with. I use his sound libraries across multiple projects as lego blocks of my creations.”
     
    Yarron Katz – AAA Composer and Sound Designer
    “Slava makes some wonderful libraries. He’s relatively new on the scene and his libraries have come to critical acclaim. He takes some general ideas, like whooshes and he injects some extremely revolutionary and innovative ideas to them, so you’re not getting another whoosh library – you’re getting something very unique, very fresh. He brings some wonderful ideas to the table.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “‘Evil Strings Tortured Wires’ is an all-scary affair with plenty of really good, nightmarish, imaginative sounds from authentic materials, like double bass, dulcimer strings and metal wires. Sound-wise, this sample pack is clean and carefully recorded. The editing and processing of sounds is top notch, with sound design techniques applied very professionally. Overall, very gritty and not for the faint of heart.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “As far as the sound goes ‘Cinematic Magical Ice’ is both beautiful and mystical. I happen to like the icy textures that are oozing with coldness. Overall, this sound library boasts a good variety of effect samples ready to drop in various cinematic projects.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “The spotlight of ‘Cinematic Wood Symphony’ is the wide range of complex sounds that can be dropped in your sound design projects. I love the Wood Movement and Tonal sounds, and I’m sure thriller and horror music composers will be delighted with the Friction and Impact sounds. If your cinematic projects are lacking texture and impact sounds ‘Cinematic Wood Symphony’ is a library to be considered – especially if you’re looking beyond common wood sounds.”
     
    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Cinematic Water Whooshes and Textures is great for anything. You won’t be hearing recordings of calm rivers or relaxing streams, but cinematic whooshes and textures for soundtrack works and media projects. Whether you’re into this type of sounds, this pack was recorded quite well, professionally edited and processed with Slava’s own flair.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Slava is back with another aggressive and energetic sample library called Resonating Metal Force – a 680 strong collection of modern metal effects captured using various tools and high-end studio equipment. The source material was edited and processed professionally for instant use. These sounds are primed for experimentation – whether you add your unique processing, layer several WAV samples or slice and dice to your heart’s content, the sky’s the limit. This sound pack is another winner.”

    Ginno Legaspi – SoundBytes Music Magazine‎
    “Sound-wise, the quality of ‘Cinematic Metal Whooshes’ is clear and punchy, and very consistent from start to finish. The whole content promises to be a tool to get you going in your cinematic adventures – and it delivers.”

    50 %
    OFF
    Ends 1719266399
  • Farm & Horse Sound Effects Animal Farm Play Track 165 sounds included $69

    This library is dedicated to popular farm animals, rural backgrounds and agricultural activities – all you need around farm life. It features 165 sounds in total, from 14 different species with multiple variations for each animal, 25 discreet rural backgrounds and 10 types of modern and traditional agricultural activities.

    Recorded and mastered at 24-bit/96kHz high-resolution, Animal Farm took over a year to get ready, since the goal was to capture as many seasonal work activities, weather conditions and animal habits, as possible.

    List of animals recorded: Cat • Chicken • Cow • Dog (Wolf hound, Sheepdog) • Duck • Fowl • Goat (Mediterranean) • Goose • Horse (Arabian, Andalusian) • Pig • Pigeon • Rooster • Sheep (Mediterranean) • Turkey

    Types of agricultural work recorded: Chopping • Feeding • Gardening • Loading Manure • Milking • Mowing • Olive harvest • Sowing • Tilling • Watering

Explore the full, unique collection here

Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • Presenting the most malfunctioning, dirty old gritty sounding engine failure library out there

    Featuring a staggering 81 files with numerous takes in most tracks, the Kaput sound effects library will cover the bases of almost any broken false starting engine scene one can imagine.

    I can honestly say, that finding the vehicles and tools for this library, has been among the most challenging I have come by. Old and broken cars and trucks are hard to come by these days. Most cars are obviously either driving and dont have start problems, and many of the rest just wont start at all.

    Just as rare are broken petrol powered tools, which usually fit the latter category of not working at all.

    Still, with amazing recording help from recordist Michal Fojcik Soundmind Poland, and just as amazing help from recordist Erik Watland from Norway, the Kaput sound effects library is featuring no less then

    24 different cars, trucks, moped and motorcycles

    1 boat engine

    A few weird sounding power generators and water pump motors

    Back firing exhausts

    Petrol powered garden tools, chain saws, and hedge trimmers

    Brutal construction machines

    From old eastern european trucks, vintage US V8 muscle trucks, classic scandinavian cars, and more modern diesel and petrol engines to funny sputtering dying petrol power tools.

    There is even a few more recording sessions planned, that just didn’t make the deadline for the first batch of sounds in this library (buying a copy of this first of sounds, will of course make any future sounds added to the library free of charge).

    KAPUT is 81 stereo and mono files, 96/24. 1,6 gb big, all UCS ready!

  • Hear the majesty of tropical seas from soothing surf, trickling water laps, and crashing wave sound effects.

  • ACOUSTIC GUITAR FOLEY FOR YOUR PROJECTS
    The SB111 ACOUSTIC GUITAR FOLEY Sound Effects Library is a collection of handling movements, grabs and sets, string noise, drags, impacts, strumming, fingerpicking, tuning, and the smashing and destroying of an acoustic guitar.

    A UNIQUE ACOUSTIC GUITAR FOLEY LIBRARY
    We’ve gone above and beyond just capturing the sounds of strumming and picking – we’ve recorded the nuances and details that make acoustic guitars so special. Like the subtle sounds of the guitar strap as it settles against your shoulder, string noise of fingers on the fretboard, the satisfying sound of the guitar being tuned, grabs and set downs, strings being clipped and even a full restringing sequence. Of course we’ve also included the playing of chords and riffs while strumming and fingerpicking – some played in tune and some out of tune. We did not forget to record your pick as it rattles around in the abyss of the guitar’s sound hole – and the satisfying sound of the guitar being smashed and destroyed. All the details you need to bring realism to your project.

    20 %
    OFF
    Ends 1719525599
  • The Drawers & Cupboards SFX library is an essential collection for professionals seeking high-quality sound effects for their projects. This library features 63 meticulously recorded sounds of opening, closing, and rummaging through cupboards and drawers, making it perfect for game developers, animators, and filmmakers.

    This library offers a diverse range of sounds, including:

    • Opening and closing cupboard doors
    • Picking up glass bottles
    • Rummaging through various materials (glass, mixed materials, containers, plastic)
    • Metal and wooden drawers opening and closing
  • Car Sound Effects Broken Car Engine Play Track 5 sounds included, 28 mins total $27

    My car engine broke! As a result of making a huge costly mistake caused by accidentally skipping an oil change service from getting dates and miles mixed up (on top of being a higher milage car), my 2006 Volvo V50 T5’s engine starting making incredibly loud knocking, clicking and rattling sounds. Took it for one last drive before it was picked up by a junk yard, and recorded the process. I put a DPA 4061 and a Rode NT5 in the engine and drove it around the neighborhood, first on residential streets, then drove it harder on some faster streets (the engine was so loud you can’t hear any other cars in the recordings), abusing the manual mode for higher rpm recordings the whole time until it started overheating, smoking and dumping liquid (coolant I think? Oil? Both?). I Quickly took the DPA out because it was right near a section of the engine that was overheating, but I left the NT5 in. Satisfied with what I recorded but still a couple miles from home, after my car cooled a bit I continued to record my drive home, this time with the DPA inside the car to get an interior perspective (this drive is labeled “bonus drive” in the library).

    This library is just 5 files, totaling 27 minutes and 28 seconds, 24/96k, 956MB. Quality Soundminer metadata and UCS compliant. Recorded with a DPA 4061 and NT5 for starts, idles, off, revving, slow to moderate driving, harder faster driving, with lots of variation. One file is just the NT5 engine recording for an additional 5 and a half minute drive, and one is just the DPA for an interior perspective of that drive.

    I’ll miss that car a lot, but at least I got some great recordings out of it! I hope you find them useful.


   

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

HTML tags are not allowed.