Asbjoern Andersen


When it comes to sound projects, sometimes the hardest part is getting the price right: You’ll want to find that sweet spot where your sound pricing allows your business to thrive and grow – while keeping it fair, competitive and transparent for your customers too.

So how do you do it? I’d noticed Kate Finan from Boom Box Post doing some great writing on the business side of sound, so I decided to hear if she had any insights on how to get pricing right. And she did indeed:

Here are Kate Finan’s 7 steps to setting the right price for sound work – including planning, rates & the initial bid + four clever alternatives to just giving a discount. Hope you find it useful!

Few people would truly describe themselves as a level-headed business person and innovative creative mind. It’s difficult to wear both hats well. As sound designers, we pride ourselves in approaching design challenges from new and exciting angles and using our creativity to elevate projects from ordinary to spectacular. We don’t generally relish wearing the business hat. Yet, most of us would still like to get paid.

That’s the crux–how do you set a price for something you love to do? The answer is: quite simply. Follow these seven steps, and you’ll find out how.
 

Step 1: Establish the services necessary for the project.

As a freelance sound designer, you will often be approached to give a “sound package.” This can include any combination of the following services:

• sound supervision (spotting, previewing, fixes, mix supervision, client correspondence)
• dialogue editorial
• sound effects design and editorial
• foley
• re-recording mix
• deliverables

Inquire as to which services they would like. Often the client will not know what they need. In that case, it is your job to either watch an early cut of the project and advise, or decide based on a verbal description of the project. A basic package for any film should include most or all of the above items.

Someone has to do all of the above jobs, the only question is: are you that person?

Don’t let the clients talk you into cutting out dialogue editorial if no one else has been hired to tackle that. Someone has to do all of the above jobs, the only question is: are you that person?

Being able to provide a list of all services you will provide rather that just giving a price for the “sound package” gives you to opportunity to express to your clients exactly how much they are getting for their money. It educates them on what goes into the process. It is also the only way that you can make an exact calculation of how much it will cost you to take the work.
 

Step 2: Decide how many hours/days of each service will be necessary.

As stated above, in order to produce a professional final product, you will need to provide most or all of the above services. If a potential client comes to you with a very low price in mind, do not negotiate by cutting services entirely. As mentioned above, someone needs to provide all of those services, so you’ll likely end up providing them for free in that case.

However, you should evaluate each project based on the length, scope, and overall budget, and then assign appropriate time for each service accordingly. For example, a two-minute student animated comedy short will require vastly different amounts of time spent on each service than a 90-minute live action World War II major studio feature film. Before bidding on a project, always ask these questions:

• What is the total run time of the project?
• What is your ideal turn around time for the project?
• What genre is it?
• Is it action-heavy or dialogue-heavy?
• What is your expected distribution? Internet, theatrical, Netflix?

Use their answers to inform your idea of the overall budget and scope of the project.
 

Step 3: Set a rate for yourself.

Here is the toughest part of the equation for most creatives: how do you set your own rate? You don’t want to come in too low and feel undervalued, but you also don’t want to come in too high and lose the bid. However, setting your rate is actually surprisingly simple. I suggest looking up the union rates for sound professionals in your country or area.

For the United States, you can find that information here.

Now, ask yourself truthfully: on a scale of talent and experience, where do I lie between complete novice and that person?

Then, assume that those rates are for the most qualified industry professionals working at a major motion picture studio on relatively high-budget projects. Now, ask yourself truthfully: on a scale of talent and experience, where do I lie between complete novice and that person? Hopefully, this will keep you from accepting jobs which pay nothing merely for the experience long after you know what you’re doing. It should also keep you from charging an exorbitant rate and constantly disappointing your clientele.

Step 4: Research rates for contractors and vendors.

There will likely be services that you need to outsource depending on the scope of each project. If you hire another freelance professional to provide a service, that person is a contractor. If you rent a facility for a service (such as a stage), that company is a vendor.

Does your film need foley? Then you need to hire a foley walker and mixer as contractors, and rent a foley stage from a vendor. Do you need to rent a large re-recording stage to accomodate the number of clients attending the mix? Do you hate editing dialogue and want to hand that part to someone else? Is the timeline so short that the project requires you to split the sound effects editorial with another person? All answers tell you which rates you will want to research.

For each item you are outsourcing, get several quotes. Inquire about stages and personnel both in your area and outside of it. With the internet, you can send the work anywhere. But, consider that hiring contractors or using vendors in areas without a large amount of sound work will be cheaper, but the people involved very well may be less experienced and need more direction from you.

Consolidate all of these quotes into one document that you save for future bids. You don’t want to have to search through your email each you are creating a new bid.
 

Step 5: Create a bid spreadsheet.

This spreadsheet is for you to keep track of the number of services, time allotted for each, the subsequent cost to you, and percent profit for the project.

Here is a sample spreadsheet that I have created using Google Drive.
sound pricing spreadsheet

Please feel free to open it and save a copy to your personal Google Drive (here it is). On that copy, you can easily enter in your information for days, rate/day, and it will calculate your individual and overall cost of services. Once you have your total cost of services, enter a package price and adjust accordingly to reach your target percent profit.

The key element of this part of the process is to establish your ideal percent profit, then mold the bid to reach it while still maintaining a total package price which seems reasonable to you. Why do you need to make a profit on top of your rate? You need it to cover electricity used, high-speed internet costs, gear, ProTools updates, that extra bedroom or office space you rent. All of these costs of running a business (and, as a freelancer, you are a business!) should be factored into the cost of each project. Once you’ve come to a package price in your spreadsheet, ask yourself: does this number make sense for the level/length of project? If not, chip away at services.
 


Popular on A Sound Effect right now - article continues below:

 

Latest releases:  
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    • Urban areas: empty streets howling and whistling, trees rustling, plastic and cloth materials flapping.
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    Featuring the expressive sounds of a middle aged female Bengal tiger, recordist and sound effects editor Chris Diebold (Spider-Man: Homecoming, Transformers: The Last Knight) captured this collection at 24-bit/192kHz using multiple microphones, including the Sanken CO-100K, which has a frequency response of 20Hz – 100kHz. This makes the natural and characteristic sounds of the tiger ripe for pitch processing and control over your sound design. Use the high-quality recordings of deep growls, gnarly crunches, and heavy chuffs to design your beasts, creatures, monsters and more.

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    As well as hand-operated tools, Nuts and Bolts gives you several power tool sound effects being operated at different intensity levels. All of the sounds in this library have been recorded in context, meaning that they reflect how you would actually use the tools, not just how they sound in a controlled studio environment. We recorded close, distant and far recordings to capture natural reverb, giving you the maximum flexibility when searching for the right sound for your projects. We also recorded dropping effects for most of the tools.

    Nuts and Bolts contains a total of 145 files (with lots of variations per file) including a designed folder of 10 sounds. This library gives you everything you need to create compelling DIY and construction soundscapes, ideal for use in a range of sound design applications including building sites, mechanics garages, joinery, metalwork workshops, painting, decorating, and demolition based scenes. All sounds have been recorded in 24bit 96khz, and have been carefully edited so that you can easily drop them into your project timeline and get working right away.

    Here are the included folders:

    Power Tools: Lovely and disturbing drills, saws and electric sanders, perfect for becoming a noisy neighbor.

    Hammers and Mallets: Hitting and dropping things as hard as possible makes a lovely sound, great for building trailer impacts.

    Toolboxes: Heavy and metallic rummaging through a large toolbox.

    Spanners: Turning bolts and spinning ratchets.

    Saws: The seminal DIY sound effects of sawing wood.

    Pliers, Grips and Screws: Micro details like these can make or break your construction scenes.

    Chisels: Hitting chisels, planing wood, and scraping.

    Pencils, Brushes and Tape: Drawing, brushing, measuring.

    Misc Tools: Vacuuming, cutting, sanding, moving ladders and many more!

    Designed Effects: A suite of heavily designed sounds which demonstrate the flexibility of the library when used for sound design.

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Need specific sound effects? Try a search below:
 

Step 6: Create a bid for the clients.

Once you have a package price which includes the necessary services and gives you a decent profit margin, you will want to create a professional-looking bid to send to your clients as a .pdf. You can make this is Quickbooks, or there are plenty of templates for invoices in Pages. Just be sure that it is clearly marked as a bid or estimate rather than a bill.

You should include a line item for each service so that they know everything you are proposing to provide. Obviously, you will not list your profit as a line item. So, remember to increase the price of each line item by the percent profit on this document. Think about shopping at a store–the price tag doesn’t tell you the factory direct price at which the store purchased the item. It tells you the price that they need you to pay in order to turn a profit.

Round each number to the closest $50 to keep it looking professional. Don’t worry about getting the total price exactly to the package price. Go ahead and let it come out a little more expensive, then add in a discount. People love discounts!

Save both the spreadsheet from step five and this .pdf bid for your records.

Bonus Expert Advice:
Create spreadsheets and .pdf estimates for common types of projects

If you often receive bid requests for similar projects, it is a great idea to create a standard spreadsheet and .pdf bid for that type of project. That way, if someone cold calls you and asks for an estimate, you can simply ask a few key questions, make easy adjustments to fine tune the services, and send it along. Knowing the minimum you will need to charge in order to break even (or, hopefully, turn a profit) off the top of your head will also allow you to easily separate the projects that will be a frustrating time-suck from the interesting creative endeavors that are worth your time.

 

Step 7: Send the bid to the clients with a professional email and hope for the best!

At this point, you are ready to send your bid to the clients with a professionally worded email. They will either accept, decline, or begin to negotiate.

If you receive an email response asking for a lower package price, it is best not to simply lower it by giving a discount. In step five, you already established that in order to provide the services listed and make a profit, this is what the package price must be. Instead, this is the time to engage in a negotiation. You may negotiate based on several tactics.

First: you can alter one or more service. If they would like a lower price, then offer to mix it at your home studio rather than at a rented facility. They may need to agree to bring fewer clients to the mix, but this may well be a sacrifice they’re willing to make to save money. You can also offer to do less of a certain service, like less custom design work or recording.

Second: you can add extra services for the same price. Maybe throw in that M&E stem for the same package amount. If you know that they will need this added service in the end, they may appreciate the foresight, and sometimes it’s less expensive for you to do everything at once.

Third: Think outside the box and negotiate with things other than money or services. This may seem counterintuitive, but it is a great idea to lower your price, but ask for something else in return. A good friend of mine often throws plug-ins and sound effects libraries into the negotiation. If you’re asked to work on a WWII tank movie, and they want an extremely low budget, ask for them to buy you that WWII period vehicle and gun SFX library and tell them it will save them on the design and recording side of things. You would likely buy it anyway, and this takes it out of your list of costs. Is the documentary you’re bidding on riddled with bad dialogue recordings?

Items like this may not exactly equal the amount of money in question, but you will get to keep them forever

Ask for them to splurge on Izotope RX for you, and tell them that it will save you tons of editorial time. Just be sure that all licenses are in your name. Items like this may not exactly equal the amount of money in question, but you will get to keep them forever. And, often productions are more willing to spend on software and other tools than wages.

Fourth: you can bundle services. This is an advanced negotiation tactic, but it really works. It makes it less clear who’s gaining or losing, which means both parties are more likely to walk away feeling it was a win/win scenario. An great example of bundling that I recently used occurred when I was asked to work on a short film that was going to be used to garner investment toward a feature of the same name. In a scenario like this, you can hold firm on your short film bid but say that if they bring the feature to you, you will deduct the price of the short from that. This makes them more likely to bring you the feature, and also saves them a considerable amount of money on the feature.

Working for the Experience

Finally, a note on working for free or, as it is often posed to us, “for the experience”/”for the credit.” Think back to step three when you set a realistic rate for yourself based on talent, knowledge, and experience. Knowledge, experience, and credits are an important form of payment when you first start working as a sound designer. Even with a sound engineering degree, I will openly say that I learned the entire profession of sound design on the job, and that took some time. Building up your portfolio, your IMDB credit list, or your experience with tackling different technical, creative, and logistical challenges and seeing the process through from start to finish are very important steps toward getting that high rate in the future.

Even with a sound engineering degree, I will openly say that I learned the entire profession of sound design on the job, and that took some time

However, after a few big projects, you should begin to be compensated for the knowledge and experience that you bring to each project.

In the freelance world, we enjoy many freedoms. The most important one is the freedom to choose whether you are perceived as a professional or a novice, and that is expressed first and foremost by your rate. Don’t short change yourself. The more you charge, the more your time and experience will be valued. That is, if you can back it up with truly solid design work.

 

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A big thanks to Kate Finan for sharing her 7 steps to setting the right price for sound work. Do you have any tips or ideas on how to do it? Please share your insights in the comments below:

Kate Finan is the co-owner of Boom Box Post, a post production sound studio in Burbank, CA. Follow Boom Box Post on Twitter and please visit www.boomboxpost.com where she and co-owner Jeff Shiffman blog regularly about creative sound design.

 
 
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Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • City Life Wind Textures II Play Track 60 sounds included, 300 mins total $60 $45

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    • Urban areas: empty streets howling and whistling, trees rustling, plastic and cloth materials flapping.
    • Rural areas: several meadows and open areas have been covered, with and without flora.
    • Indoor perspectives with wind howling and whistling through windows at different speeds. Other interior locations included are two shelters and an old attic, where wood was resonating all over.
    • Wind through vegetation: bushes, trees, palm leaves, lanceolate leaves.
    • LOM Geofon was used both in stereo and mono configurations. Attached to several materials (chimneys, ACs, bottles, chains) blasted by wind. Depending on the homogeneity of the sounds, these files have been delivered either in mono as two different channels or in stereo. You can always split them up.
    • Intensity varies from calm breezes to gusts of up to 80 km/h.
    • Recorded around Southern England.
    • Gear used: Sound Devices MixPre 6-II, Zoom F8, Sennheiser 8040 in ORTF, Sennheiser 8050 or 8040 with MKH 30 in M/S, Sony D100, LOM Mikro Usis, Clippy Primo EM172, LOM Geofon.
    • UCS Compatible Metadata embedded. Fields included CatID, Category, Subcategory, FX Name, Filename, Description, BWDescription, Library, RecType, RecMedium, Microphone, Designer, Manufacturer, Keywords, VendorCategory.
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  • Add depth and ferocity to your scenes and creature designs with the untamed energy of Wildlife Collection: Bengal Tiger. With 150 vivid tiger sound effects and vocalizations, this pristinely captured specialty library delivers a wide variety of tiger recordings that are ready for naturalistic use or manipulation for sound design applications.

    Featuring the expressive sounds of a middle aged female Bengal tiger, recordist and sound effects editor Chris Diebold (Spider-Man: Homecoming, Transformers: The Last Knight) captured this collection at 24-bit/192kHz using multiple microphones, including the Sanken CO-100K, which has a frequency response of 20Hz – 100kHz. This makes the natural and characteristic sounds of the tiger ripe for pitch processing and control over your sound design. Use the high-quality recordings of deep growls, gnarly crunches, and heavy chuffs to design your beasts, creatures, monsters and more.

    In addition to the raw recordings, this collection also contains designed and “hyped” sounds, ready to drag-and-drop directly into your monstrous designs and animalistic scenes. Each sound file is embedded with rich, descriptive metadata for fast, intuitive search results to help increase efficiency and sustain creativity.

    Key Features:

    • 150 sound effects (3GB)
    • Includes 104 multi-microphone recordings
      • Sanken CO-100K, Sanken CS-1e, Neumann RSM-191
    • 24-bit/192kHz broadcast .wav files
    • Rich embedded metadata descriptions
    • 100% Royalty-Free
  • Recorded in the woods, two pit bull families. These guys are all playing, but they sound totally fierce. Compress a little, pitch down a little, all fun.

    These are wonderful recordings of dogs. Very scary very vocal very violent. Really good deep growling with lots of character. Just a joy to design with.

    20 %
    OFF
    Ends 1596837599
  • Nuts and Bolts contains a huge array of DIY and construction themed sound effects featuring tools that are used by tradesmen such as hammers, saws, chisels and spanners, as well as several other miscellaneous tools such as brushes, tape, filler guns and of course, nuts, bolts and screws.

    As well as hand-operated tools, Nuts and Bolts gives you several power tool sound effects being operated at different intensity levels. All of the sounds in this library have been recorded in context, meaning that they reflect how you would actually use the tools, not just how they sound in a controlled studio environment. We recorded close, distant and far recordings to capture natural reverb, giving you the maximum flexibility when searching for the right sound for your projects. We also recorded dropping effects for most of the tools.

    Nuts and Bolts contains a total of 145 files (with lots of variations per file) including a designed folder of 10 sounds. This library gives you everything you need to create compelling DIY and construction soundscapes, ideal for use in a range of sound design applications including building sites, mechanics garages, joinery, metalwork workshops, painting, decorating, and demolition based scenes. All sounds have been recorded in 24bit 96khz, and have been carefully edited so that you can easily drop them into your project timeline and get working right away.

    Here are the included folders:

    Power Tools: Lovely and disturbing drills, saws and electric sanders, perfect for becoming a noisy neighbor.

    Hammers and Mallets: Hitting and dropping things as hard as possible makes a lovely sound, great for building trailer impacts.

    Toolboxes: Heavy and metallic rummaging through a large toolbox.

    Spanners: Turning bolts and spinning ratchets.

    Saws: The seminal DIY sound effects of sawing wood.

    Pliers, Grips and Screws: Micro details like these can make or break your construction scenes.

    Chisels: Hitting chisels, planing wood, and scraping.

    Pencils, Brushes and Tape: Drawing, brushing, measuring.

    Misc Tools: Vacuuming, cutting, sanding, moving ladders and many more!

    Designed Effects: A suite of heavily designed sounds which demonstrate the flexibility of the library when used for sound design.

 
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6 thoughts on “How to Set (and Get) the Right Price for Your Audio Work

  1. This was very insightful! Thank you for the great article and sharing the spreadsheet.

    I have a question / discussion that I would like to add in. Often we spend many hours on meetings with the director (or producer or whatever crew might be) or even sending emails back and forth. On a lot of cases it seems that there is a tendency to “ignore” that also this is time consuming (if time is money…). One “trick” I have been using when I feel that the director / producer acts like we are permanently available, is to sharply but sort of enthusiastically say “I have 30 minutes available, can we meet then?”. More than not, it´s not uncommon to spend altogether an entire work day with meetings that are technically not payed.
    So, I wonder how fellow sound designers out there deal with these situations – are you somehow including that time in the rounded numbers, thinking about it on the profit percentage or any other way? Let´s say one earns $50 / hour, that is how much we are “loosing” in one hour meeting, for example. Or is it an investment?
    Even though that is certainly a variety of cases and contexts, it would be great to have a feedback on this. :)

  2. Thanks for reading, Matthew and Melissa! I’m very glad that you enjoyed the post. Melissa, I love that you bring up how difficult it is to budget (both time and money) for client interactions. The only interactions that I consider to be “investments” are the ones pertaining to making and presenting the bid. Once a project bid is accepted, I consider all of my time (including spots, previews, re-recording mixes, and any other client interactions) to be part of the bid price. Generally, I list those interactions under the Sound Supervision line item. For that reason, it’s VERY important to take those interactions into consideration when you’re creating the bid. Depending on the length and scope of each project, in general I allow at least half a day for meeting the clients and spotting, half to a full day to put the project together and tweak things (if you are hiring others and need to compile their work, a full day for the client preview and fixes, and a full day for any re-recording mixes you plan to attend. When I first speak with new clients and present my bid, I also go over what each of these meetings will accomplish and when in the process they will happen to ensure that the clients know that there are set times at which they should give notes. In general that keeps them from emailing single notes on a daily basis. I also schedule all of these meetings and send out calendar appointments so that we have an exact in and out time. I believe that this saves everyone a lot of time and will truly present you as a professional. I hope that helps!

  3. Hi, Kate!

    Thank you so much for all the additional information. This is truly helpful and assures any sound designer how worth their time is.

  4. Kate,
    Thank you, thank you, thank you for writing this. It helped me tremendously. I just moved to Portland, OR a year ago and there aren’t many sound design studios here (only 2), so I haven’t had much luck with meeting other sound designers to network with and learn best business practices. I really appreciate you taking the time to do this.

    Warm Regards,
    Christiann A. Burch

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