How to create a sound effects library 344 Audio Asbjoern Andersen


How do you create a sound effects library? The team at 344 Audio have steadily grown their catalog of great sound effects releases, and below they give you an overview of their sound library creation process:
Written by Alex Gregson and the team at 344 Audio
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Creating a sound effects library is a task that combines creative thinking, technical execution and project management skills. At 344 Audio we have developed an efficient and effective process that has been honed over countless releases, and allows us to consistently generate new content over time.

In this article, we will share this process with you step by step, and give you all the tools you need to start creating your own sound effects libraries.
 

 

Step 1 – Concept

The first thing you need to figure out when creating a sound effects library is the concept. This can be anything you want, but it helps to focus on a certain theme, aesthetic or type of sounds that work together.

Some previously examples of our library concepts include:

Practical Doors – Practical Doors contains a range of interior and exterior door sound effects with common uses: open, close, creak, slam, keys, locks, latches, knocks and many more!

Trailer instruments Designed – Trailer Instruments Designed contains a variety of effects captured from instruments and manipulated into impacts, drones, stingers, risers and more.

The Burger Kitchen – The Burger Kitchen contains a wide variety of food preparation, eating and handling sounds captured in our foley suite.

As we can see, these libraries each have a unique theme and focus on different kinds of sounds, and would be useful in different contexts. Having a solid concept is key as it not only gives you creative boundaries to work within, but will help add some personality to your library and help it stand out in the marketplace.
 

Step 2 – Structure

Once you have your concept nailed down the next step is to decide on the structure of your library. This means how many sounds will there be in total? How will you organise the sounds within the library and how many subfolders will your library contain?

Let’s use Epic Impacts Vol. 1 as an example.

80 files in total

Folder 1 – Electronic Impacts – 20 Sounds
Folder 2 – Organic Impacts – 20 Sounds
Folder 3 – Designed Impacts – 20 Sounds
Folder 4 – Crazy Metallic Impacts – 10 Sounds
Folder 5 – Sub Impacts – 10 Sounds

Using this structure as a reference, you can make a list of sounds that you will need to record to build the library.

Structuring your library in this way breaks up the content and makes it easier for the user to find the sounds they are looking for. It also helps you during the recording and editing phase as you know exactly what you are working towards in terms of the number of sounds and what is in each subfolder.
 

Step 3 – Recording

Now we are getting to the fun stuff. The recording phase is where the magic happens, so it’s crucial that you get this stage of the process absolutely spot on!

A few things to consider before you begin recording are:

• What kind of sounds are you recording? Are they more external “field recording” sounds or are you able to capture them in a controlled studio environment?

• Do the sounds need to be in mono or stereo? Mono is most common for “spot fx” and stereo is more commonly used for atmos, or sounds with an inherent spacial element to them such as a car passing left to right, trains going past etc.

• What kind of microphones and pickup patterns will you be using? Dynamic, Condenser, Shotgun, Cardiod mic etc.

• Are the sounds being processed heavily during the editing & design stage?

Once you have given this some thought and have decided on your approach, it’s time to start making some noise. Whilst the recording stage can most definitely be completed by one person, it is much easier when there are 2 people doing it, as one of you can take charge of recording whilst the other can “perform” the sounds. We recommend working in a team of 2 for maximum speed and efficiency during this stage of the process.

Operating as a pair, work through the list of sounds that you wrote during the structure phase until you have captured all of the source material that you need in order to build the library. As a general rule it’s always more favourable to have too much source material over not enough, so make an effort to capture as much as possible. By taking a little extra time and capturing as many sounds as you can you will be giving yourself the most amount of content to work with in the editing & design phase.
 

Step 4 – Editing & Additional Design

With the recording complete it’s now time to move into the editing and design phase. This is where you will take your raw source material and start bringing them to life, either through editing or additional design and effects processing.

When editing your sounds, it’s important to consider the end user and in what context they will be using the sounds. For example, when editing our Practical Doors library, we specifically made all of the doors have a consistent level and frequency content, so that they would all feel right when placed in a scene together. You should edit your sounds in a way that makes things easy for the sound editor so that they can drop sounds into their project timeline and work within the scene with minimal fuss.

There is a lot more to editing than just chopping files, making fades and stripping silences. The editing phase is your chance to be really creative, and give your sounds that bold, dramatic feel that will make them stand out.

Some techniques to implement during editing include:

Play with extremes – Don’t play it safe. Embrace large dynamics and make use of contrast between quiet and loud sounds to maximise their impact.

Heighten the drama – Try and edit your sounds in a way that conjures up an image, indicates some real world physicality and motion or has a visceral effect on you when you hear it. For example, in our gore library Slaughter we were editing sounds for a human body being crushed. We spend a lot of time thinking about how this would actually play out in reality, and the different phases of the body being broken down, skin, bones, blood, guts etc. Approach editing like this took our sound from “decent” to genuinely stomach-churning, which is exactly the effect a gore library needs to have.

Fill out the frequency content – Combine and layer different recordings together so that you can fill up the frequency spectrum and give each sound that big, bold weightiness that is so characteristic of modern movie sound effects.

There may be instances where editing isn’t enough and you must use effects processing to create the sounds required for your library. This is something we do quite often, especially on libraries with an otherworldly or Sci-Fi concept to them, or when we are constructing drones and atmospheres from everyday sound sources.

Some go-to processing methods that we love to use are:

• Reverbs with long decay times.
• Modulation effects – Flangers, phasers, chorus.
• Crazy comb filters, LFOs and modulation delays.
• Pitch and formant shifting.

Once you have completed the editing and design and have your effects sounding just as you want them it’s time to move forward to the quality control phase.
 

Step 5 – Quality Control

The quality control phase is super important, as it is your last chance to address any errors in your library before release, and make sure that everything is sounding perfect.

Firstly, you can export all of your edited and designed sounds out from your DAW and organise them into seperate folders using the structure you came up with earlier. Once you have this done, listen through all of your sounds from start to finish and be attentive to any technical or aesthetic issues as you go. These may be things such as excess silence in the file, unwanted clicks and pops and sounds being cut off from improper fade ins/outs. Make notes as you listen through and then make any adjustments needed to the sounds which have unwanted elements or errors in them.

Most common issues can be avoided by paying close attention during the recording and editing phases, but it’s always worth double and triple checking in case any unwanted sounds have slipped through the cracks and made it all the way to this stage without being flagged up and corrected.

Once you have checked through all of your sounds and are happy with everything it’s time to embed metadata into the files. Metadata are additional tags that you can attach to a file that makes it easier for people to find when they are searching through their sound libraries.

For example, we may have a bone breaking sound called “Bone Break 01.Wav” but we would like to give it additional tags so that it appears in searches relating to “horror” and “gore”.

There are several programs that will allow you to achieve this but we use the sound effects platform Soundly, as it has a great interface and is really helpful for organising your sound effects.

Within Soundly, select the sound you want to add metadata, right click and go “edit metadata”. This will then bring up a window where you can edit both the file metadata and file originator (Author of the file, in our case 344 Audio). In the metadata section simply type your additional search tags each separated by a comma.

File Name: Bone Break 01
Originator: 344 Audio (In your case it might be “Johns Samples” etc.)
Metadata: Bone, Break, Snap, Injury, Gore, Horror, Violent, Fall, Fracture

By adding the metadata it makes it much easier for the user to find your sounds and gives them a little bit more information about the context in which to use them.
 

Step 6 – Artwork, Description, Demo Track

The final stage before releasing your library is to create some killer artwork, write up an enticing description for use on online stores, and make a demo track to show of your library and get people hyped up.

Artwork – We think its best to keep things simple and consistent when it comes to artwork. Use an online tool to create some custom graphics that can be saved as a template for use across your future library releases. There are a range of awesome websites that allow you to make custom graphics. We use Adobe Spark as it has a large range of stock images to choose from, and a user friendly interface.

Choose a background image that links to the concept of your library and then overlay some text with the name of the library. You can then finish it off with your company or brand logo in the corner to let your users know who the library is from.

Artwork examples:

Here are some examples of 344 Audio’s cover art:

  • Sci-Fi Vehicles Vol. 3 is a collection of 4 sci-fi inspired land vehicles, meticulously designed and crafted from the ground up.

    Our Audio Craftsmen used a plethora of sound design techniques to create 4 unique land-based crafts, each inspired by a particular shape, size, material, or purpose;

    Underwater Explorer – A small 2 person vehicle to explore the treasures below.
    Segway – A small personal transporter. Capable of fast, swift movements if used by a skilled pilot.
    Chopper – The helicopter technology of the future.
    Train – Large public transport of a struggling future civilization

    For each vehicle you will find sounds covering engine turn on, idle, speed up, slow down and turn off, alongside 12 pass by’s at various speeds and distances.

    This library is a perfect addition to sci-fi Film, TV & Game trailers, or productions with a futuristic, experimental or abstract edge. Use these sounds in projects to inject larger than life, futuristic textures into your vehicle sound design.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

  • Sci-Fi Vehicles Vol. 2 is a collection of 4 sci-fi inspired land vehicles, meticulously designed and crafted from the ground up.

    Our Audio Craftsmen used a plethora of sound design techniques to create 4 unique land-based crafts, each inspired by a particular shape, size, material, or purpose;

    Electric Hoverbike – A personal use vehicle to get where you need to be, as smoothly as possible.
    Fire Speeder – A land speeder similar in shape to a modern box car, with 3 fire fuelled thrusters.
    Space Bike – The extra-terrestrial equivalent to the Harley Davidson.
    Future Dystopia Car – Mad Max meets Dune. A combination of modern motor car and future technology.

    For each vehicle you will find sounds covering engine turn on, idle, speed up, slow down and turn off, alongside 12 pass by’s at various speeds and distances.

    This library is a perfect addition to sci-fi Film, TV & Game trailers, or productions with a futuristic, experimental or abstract edge. Use these sounds in projects to inject larger than life, futuristic textures into your vehicle sound design.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

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  • Sci-Fi Vehicles Vol. 1 is a collection of 4 sci-fi inspired flying vehicles, meticulously designed and crafted from the ground up.

    Our Audio Craftsmen used a plethora of sound design techniques to create 4 unique air-based spaceships, each inspired by a particular shape, size, material, or purpose;

    BWTG2002 – Large Cargo Ship
    SLS2512 – Personal Speed Craft
    VIRGL889 – War Jet
    VSL1711 – Transport Carrier

    For each vehicle you will find sounds covering engine turn on, idle, speed up, slow down and turn off, alongside 12 pass bys at various speeds and distances.
    This library is a perfect addition to sci-fi Film, TV & Game trailers, or productions with a futuristic, experimental or abstract edge. Use these sounds in projects to inject larger than life, futuristic textures into your vehicle sound design.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

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  • Illumination Designed Bundle Vol. 1 features an experimental collection of sounds crafted from the electromagnetic signals of various light source.

    This bundle offers a variety of sci-fi inspired sounds, including cinematic elemenets, drones/ambiences and explosions. Our Audio Craftsmen used a Lite2Sound photodiode amplifier to capture the electric signal lights emit. These were then meticulously edited and manipulated to create a series of unique sounds.

    The 3.27GB collection includes three volumes:

     

    Illumination Designed Vol. 1:

    A series of unique cinematic elements that blend stingers, risers, impacts and low frequency rumbles.

    Illumination Designed Vol. 2:

    A series of unique ambiences and drones.

    Illumination Designed Vol. 3:

    A series of futuristic, hi-tech explosions.

     

    This bundle is designed to enhance film, TV, and game productions or trailers with an experimental, cyberpunk, or abstract edge. The sounds are suitable for genres like sci-fi, thriller, and fantasy, adding mystery, eeriness, and tension to projects.

    All sounds are delivered in a high-quality 24Bit 96kHz format, allowing for further sonic manipulation. They have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for easy organization and use.

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  • Illumination Designed Vol. 3 is a collection of unique sci-fi themed explosions, designed using the electromagnetic signals from various light sources.

    Our Audio Craftsmen used a Lite2Sound photodiode amplifier to capture signals from a variety of light sources, such as; Dimmable room lights, RGB lights, Fairy lights, an oscilloscope screen, and many more. These sounds were then meticulously edited and manipulated in a variety of ways, including synthesis, to create a series of futuristic, hi-tech explosions.

    This library is a perfect addition to Film, TV & Game trailers, or productions with a cyberpunk, experimental or abstract edge. Use these sounds in sci-fi, thriller and action projects to inject larger than life, futuristic textures into your sound design.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

    20 %
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  • Illumination Designed Vol. 2 is a collection of abstract ambiences and drones, designed using the electromagnetic signals from various light sources.

    Our Audio Craftsmen used a Lite2Sound photodiode amplifier to capture signals from a variety of light sources, such as; Dimmable room lights, RGB lights, Fairy lights, an oscilloscope screen, and many more. These sounds were then meticulously edited and manipulated in a variety of ways, including synthesis, to create a series of unique ambiences

    This library is a perfect addition to Film, TV & Game trailers, or productions with a cyberpunk, experimental or abstract edge. Use these sounds in sci-fi, horror and action projects to inject otherworldy textures into your sound design.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

    20 %
    OFF
  • Illumination Designed Vol. 1 is a collection of cinematic elements designed using the electromagnetic signals from various light sources.

    Our Audio Craftsmen used a Lite2Sound photodiode amplifier to capture signals from a variety of light sources, such as; Dimmable room lights, RGB lights, Fairy lights, an oscilloscope screen, and many more. These sounds were then meticulously edited and manipulated to create a series of unique cinematic elements that blend stingers, risers, impacts and low frequency rumbles.

    This library is a perfect addition to Film, TV & Game trailers, or productions with a cinematic, experimental or abstract edge. Use these sounds in horror, thriller, sci-fi and action projects to create moments of mystery, eeriness and tension.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

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  • Suburban Amsterdam Vol. 1 is a collection of recordings captured in the beautiful Vondelpark and the surrounding Amsterdam South District.

    Our Audio Craftsmen captured a variety of settings, at different times of day within the sprawling Vondelpark. Including sounds such as birds, pedestrian walla, rusting trees and more. You’ll also find the surrounding streets bustling with trams, bikes, pedestrians etc. Plus, Internal apartment ambiences.

    All sounds are delivered in 24Bit 96kHz format allowing further sonic manipulation and have been meticulously edited and tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

    20 %
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Descriptor – This covers all of the text that will be used to help sell the library and is broken down into product tagline and product description.

Your tagline should be short, sweet and enticing. Try and write something that will wet the appetite of a potential customer and get them intrigued about the sounds in the library.

Our tagline for British Soldier Voices – “British Soldier Voices contains 800+ soldier vocalisations including orders, commands, shouts, grunts and more performed at different intensities. All recorded up close and personal for use in video games, film and other media content. Recorded in 24Bit 96kHz, allowing for further sonic manipulation.

Your product description goes into more detail and explains to the customer exactly what is contained within the library, and some specific technical information such as number of files and sample rate etc.

Our product description for “British Soldier Voices”: Phrases include genuine language used by SAS, Army, Royal Navy and Paratroopers as well as exaggerated script elements. We consulted real British Armed Forces Personnel to ensure that our scripts were accurate and performed correctly by our voice talent. Both modern phrases and historical phrases are included, extending the libraries use beyond modern warzones.

Whether you are making a FPS game featuring the SAS, a film featuring the armed forces or need voice effects for training purposes, this library covers both real life commands as well as phrases included for dramatic effect. All lines are included clean along with a processed version to add quick army radio comms to any project, perfect for video game implementation!

If you think your sound collection is in need of some reinforcements then this is the library for you!
Here are the included folders:

Whispering: Perfect for stealth mission and special forces operations, using the element of surprise.
Talking: Soldiers speaking at normal levels, perfect for instructing commands or for training exercises.
Shouting: Perfect intonation for heavy battle in close proximity with the enemy, lock and load!
Grunts: A collection of grunts and efforts perfect for close-quarters combat or when a soldier is hit.

Specs: 1600+ files • 1600+ sounds • 24 Bit / 96 kHz | 16 Bit / 44.1 kHz • 435 MB • Includes metadata

Demo Track – Most people are going to want to listen to some examples of the library before making a purchase, so here is where the demo track comes in.

The demo track should be about a minute in length and show off the full range of sounds within your library in an interesting and exciting way. Be creative and try and create something that is fun to listen to and links back to the concept of the library. Try and give your demo track a sense of rhythm and that it is building towards a climax. Even if the sounds in your library don’t have a musical quality to them, injecting a bit of rhythm and bounce to your demo track will help your library stand out and give the potential customer a positive impression.

 

Keys To Success

Whilst we have given you our step by step process in a general sense, below are a few extra tips that will help you turbocharge your workflow and generate consistent results over time.

Teamwork is king – There’s nothing that you can do alone that wouldn’t have been clone in less time and to a better standard than in a team. Develop a team of people to work on your libraries and you can complete a more diverse range of projects in less time than alone.

Break up the workload – Split the different stages of the process amongst the different members of your team. Whilst one person is recording someone else can be preparing the pro tools session for editing. Or if one person is editing someone else can be writing the descriptions and creating the artwork.

Develop a repeatable process – It sounds like a no-brainer but develop a process for creating sound effects libraries that you can repeat time and time again. This way no matter what the concept or content of the library is, everyone will be on the same page and know where they are up to in the process, and what stage comes next.

Be consistent – By keeping things consistent you will be able to produce content as faster speeds. By working in the same studio, following the same step by step process with the same team of people and equipment you are eliminating unknown variables and will over time become a well-drilled and efficient unit.

We hope you enjoyed this article! Please check out our full catalog at A Sound Effect here, and be sure to leave any questions or comments below.

 

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THE WORLD’S EASIEST WAY TO GET INDEPENDENT SOUND EFFECTS:
 
A Sound Effect gives you easy access to an absolutely huge sound effects catalog from a myriad of independent sound creators, all covered by one license agreement - a few highlights:

  • Dinosaurs Vol. 2 is the second edition of our popular Dinosaurs sound effects series.

    This library contains a wealth of pre-historic sound effects, covering a range of different dinosaur types. Inside we have carnivores, herbivores, scavengers, flyers and even baby dinosaurs, allowing you to craft your own custom Jurassic soundscape.

    To create this collection, our audio craftsmen unleashed their inner Dinosaur, recording a diverse array of sounds that includes roars, growls, sniffs, breathing, eating, and eggs hatching.

    This library is perfect for use in monster movie projects such as Godzilla, King Kong, Jurassic Park, and is also well suited to covering video game creatures and enemies.

    All files are supplied in 24Bit 96kHz allowing for further sonic manipulation and have been tagged with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

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  • Creature Sound Effects Dinosaurs Play Track 32 sounds included $16.80

    Witness the terrible and wondrous sounds of the long gone rulers of Earth, with our new library, Dinosaurs, containing audio brought back from 65 million years in the past.

    Our Audio Craftsmen have captured the roars, rumbles and groans of a variety of Dinosaurs, from Triceratops to the King himself, T-Rex!

    All sounds were recorded in our acoustically treated Foley suite in 24Bit 96kHz allowing further sonic manipulation. We then meticulously edited and tagged the files with extensive UCS compliant metadata for ease of use.

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  • Vielklang Instant Harmony 2 is an instrument for easy generation of harmonies from an audio or MIDI melody. The utilization of voice leading and harmony progression models allows vielklang to create harmony parts in a more musical way than traditional harmony processors and makes it a versatile and creative tool for musicians, songwriters and producers.

    vielklang utilizes zplane´s widely-used élastique SOLOIST engine for high quality pitch shifting and time stretching.


    The new version introduces the following features:

    • advanced pitch editing with direct tool access
    • new sleek interface
    • vibrato and tremolo generator
    • hybrid view for score-like harmony visualization
    • MIDI harmonization
    • multiple file harmonization
    • Instant Harmony V2.0 & Advanced Pitch Editing
    • Harmonize your melody with one single click – loading a single-voiced audio file – and create natural-sounding background choirs and brass arrangements.


    vielklang Instant Harmony generates harmonies with 2-4 voices. It is packed with musical intelligence and music theory: it detects the best fitting harmonies for each individual input melody, and automatically synthesizes up to four voices with the voices not merely running in parallel but with their voicings selected to sound most natural (voice leading).

    The advanced pitch editing controls (full version only!) give you fast and easy access to pitch, timing, vibrato control, formant shift, and to many more editing options.

    DOWNLOAD THE DEMO HERE
    WIN | MAC

Explore the full, unique collection here

Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • Are you looking for the most creative Magic Spells sound design for your project? Then look no further / you are at the right place….

    Unearth the mystical power of ELEMENTAL FANTASY MAGIC SOUND EFFECTS, a memorising collection of high quality, ready-to-use spell-casting sounds that will transmogrify your film, game, or animation from wheezy wizard to unstoppable sorcerer! You cannot afford to miss on the cutting edge sounds of EARTH, FIRE, WATER, AIR (wind) and WOOD spells and rituals contained within, expertly crafted by our industry-leading AAA sound designers.

    LIMITLESS POTENTIAL
    Every action, scene, and scenario is covered by a vast array of WHOOSHES, THROWS, IMPACTS, CHARGED SPELLS, LOOPS, DRONES, and many other variations, expertly designed to give your project the magic touch.

    ENDLESS FLEXIBILITY
    With a dizzying selection of variant options, including LOOPS, LAYERS, DIFFERENT INTENSITY LEVELS, MULTIPLE LENGTHS, SIMPLIFIED and COMPLEX VERSIONS, FULL SEQUENCES, and many more, a whole world of magical possibilities is at your fingertips.

    PERFECT FOR:
    • Video Games
    • Slot Games
    • Film / Animation
    • Ads / Trailers
    • YouTube Videos
    • Live Events
    • Sound Design
    …and all other audio-visual productions

    TECHNICAL DETAILS:
    • 240 Audio Files (80 original sounds)
    • WAV Format: 24 Bit, 96 kHz and 16 Bit, 44.1 kHz
    • MP3 Format: 320 Kbps
    • Unpacked Size: 299 MB
    • Total Run Time: 18m 46s

    So what are you waiting for?

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    Want this awesome sound pack even cheaper + tons more of magic spells?
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  • The inner sounds of a Big Red Cooling System at the back of a small factory.

    Metallic drones, hums and watery trickles. Perfect for sound design and sound morphing into dark atmospheric ambiences.

    Number of Sounds : 18

    Number of Files :  18    

    Total Audio Time  : 1 hours 11 minutes  

    Type : WAV Mono

    Sample Rate / Bit Rate : 192 kHz / 24 Bit 

    Mastered : No

    Normalised : No

    Looped Files : Yes 

    Size : 2.48 GB

     

    Recorder : Sound Devices Mix Pre 3 II

    Microphones :  LOM Geofon

    Microphone Configuration : Magnet

     

    Metadata : Files are stamped with detailed UCS compliant metadata in Soundminer

    Documentation Included : Copyright, EULA, Images, Metadata (exported in multiple formats)

    License : A Sound Effect EULA / Terms and Conditions https://www.asoundeffect.com/license-agreement/

     

    KEYWORDS : Ambient, Bubbling, Cooling System, Dripping, Droning, Factory, Humming, Mechanical, Metal, Pipes, Tank, Watery, Whining, Workshop

    FXNAME : Atmospheric, Abandoned Environment, Dark Ambience, Design Source, Drone, Dystopian, Eerie, Factory Ambience, Metal Sound Effects, Metal Textures, Post Apocalyptic, Sound Morph

  • DopeSick blends organic cinematic, sci-fi and modern electronic sound design for the creation of percussive impacts and rhythmic sonic cues for film scores, hi energy movie trailers, IDM, Futuristic Hip-Hop and different forms of electronic music that require sophisticated sound design at its best.

    The library features a vast array of timbres with a high degree of playability and musicality: raw hits, heavy alien impacts, cinematic/electronic hits, stingers and sequences, one-shots tones, trailer kits and more.

  • For Old Broken Piano we have recorded an old piano manufactured in the 1940s by the brothers Manegold. It has not been maintained and tuned for decades, giving it a unique, dark and nostalgic sound character.
    The instrument was recorded with a Sennheiser MKH 8040 Stereo Pair connected to a Sound Devices 702T.

    MKH 8040 are microphones with extended frequency response up to 50.000 Hz, which is great if you want to further process, re-pitch or stretch audio files.

    Rather unconventional approaches were used to „play“ the piano: Not a single key was touched! It was performed using a violin bow, various mallets and sticks, kitchen utensils, sticky tape and bare hands. The casing of the piano was partly taken apart to get direct access to the strings and the interior components of the instrument.

    A wide array of interesting sounds have been achieved by bowing, scraping or hitting single and multiple strings or parts of the wood body. For longer resonances, the sustain pedal was pressed down during almost all recordings.

    Old Broken Piano is a collabration between SampleTraxx and german sound designer Sebastian Emling.

    This library is the ideal companion for any professional sound designer, trailer or film composer.

  • City Life Sound Effects Walla, Public Places Play Track 137+ sounds included, 304 mins total $23

    Walla, Public Places sounds and ambiences.

    Walla backgrounds and public ambiences, sound textures. European languages. Recorded in European countries.
    In most of the recordings languages are indistinguishable, background babbling, hum, ambience. In some cases language can be recognized and this is mentioned in the name of the file.
    Check the sound list to see  if this is what you’re looking for.
    High quality audio recorded with care (detailed description of audio/mic technique used is in metadata chunk).
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