Game Audio GDC 2019 Asbjoern Andersen


Did you miss GDC 2018 (or do you just want to relive it)? Good news: Colin Andrew Grant shares his detailed insights and experiences from this year's major game audio event right here:
Written by Colin Andrew Grant
Please share:
 

This year marked both my second GDC and my second year working in the game industry. Quite a bit has changed since I first walked the halls of Moscone: I graduated from a postgraduate program, moved to L.A, and tentatively began my career as a freelancer. Though still nervous about attending such a massive convention meant for interacting with others after a year of mostly talking (yelling) at my DAW, I was excited to make new connections, meet up with old friends, and reflect upon what has changed and what has stayed the same for both myself and the industry at large.

SUNDAY

Though the conference did not officially begin, Designing Sound hosted a meetup the night before. Meeting at the Broken Rack Bar, it was a low key hang to slide everyone into GDC mode. What was special about this meetup was that Designing Sound and UVI prepared tours of the Vintage Synth Museum. Being able to play around with a Wurlitzer 200A and Roland TR-808 among other synths, I can see why synthheads consider them addicting to collect. It was a fun time of making bleeps and bloops that ended fairly early. We all needed our rest for the lengthy week ahead.

MONDAY

Damian and Anton stand in a crowded coffee shop hosting their podcast.Bright and early Monday morning at 7AM, Game Audio descended on Sightglass Coffee for the Game Audio Podcast led by Anton Woldhek and Damian Kastbauer. From Monday to Saturday we all (tried) to wake up and talk about what we learned the previous days, what we wanted to learn the day of, and any other topic that crossed our minds. I then attended a small round table led by Power Up Audio. There they shared tips for how to work with a partner, interact with potential clients, and how to pitch a reel for a bid. You’ll notice a common thread here of members of the game audio community sharing information and their time for free. I then relaxed on the second floor of Moscone Center West, playing games at The Mild Rumpus. One game that really stood out was Small Talk by Pale Room. With stunning art and gentle music, It’s the kind of intimate game that made me want to explore the characters and their thoughts forever. Later that night, we met up at the Terroir Wine Bar for an informal game audio meet up. The bar was a quiet reprieve from the noise of GDC, though it was filled to the brim with bodies and overflowed into the cool streets of San Francisco. It was a relaxing way to start off GDC since the conference floor was yet to be open and there were no audio talks that day. Tuesday would mark the beginning of rooms packed with conference attendees, raring to learn more about how sound works in games.

TUESDAY

This year, I made the decision to expand the scope of the talks that I attended beyond just audio. Though last year it was great to get acquainted with the community, I was told by multiple GDC veterans that there’s more to life than just audio. Since we have to interact with other elements of the industry at work, it only makes sense to do the same with education. The first talk I attended on Tuesday was “Intensely Practical Tips for Growing an Indie Studio”. There were two main reasons for me attending this:

1. Understanding what it takes to run an indie house will help me understand what many of my clients are going through when we’re not talking about sound.

2. I would love to one day run my own audio service studio, so the lessons being taught were incredibly applicable to my long-term career plans.

Given by Alexis Kennedy of FailBetter Games and Weather Factory, he detailed the need for studios to write down mission statements and the core pillars that define them. Whether it’s making money, being heavily narrative, or relying on a core set of beliefs, knowing what you want to focus on and understanding that those pillars may shift as the company grows can give an aimless studio direction.

After that incredibly enlightening talk I strapped up my boots and attended Audio Bootcamp XVII. The first session that I attended was “Programming Composers and Composing Programmers” headed by Victoria Dorn of Sony Interactive Entertainment and “Adding Punch to Your Sounds” by Gina Zdanowicz of Serial Lab Studios. Like many of us, though I’ve dipped my toe into programming, the vast ocean of code that exists has the ability to fill me with existential dread. Dorn’s talk was incredibly informative and broke the basic building blocks into very digestible parts. The second half of her talk was geared towards programmers interested in working with music and sound. Though obvious in hindsight, it’s easy to forget that words such as transient and downbeat aren’t part of most people’s lexicon. It’s refreshing to see an effort made to have talks be interdisciplinary and bridge the gap in vocabulary.

Gina Zdanowicz’s talk was focused giving impact to our sounds, allowing them to cut through the mix. In this talk, Zdanowicz gave many tips and plugin suggestions such as making the transient sharper while lowering the rest of the sound in order to give impact while not raising the levels. Giving the sounds movement with tools such as Tremolator and UHBIK’s frequency shifting tool can give the sounds character and keep them interesting over time.
 


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  • AUDIO LAYERING WIZARD


    SoundWeaver helps you design new sounds from existing audio material in less time.

    CREATE MORESKIP THE BUSYWORK

    USE CASES

    • Produce more assets and increase productivity on tight schedules
    • Set up your sound design session with ready-to-use sound combinations
    • Generate variations with ease instead of manually tweaking everything
    • Find new combinations, discover and create new flavors and variety within your library

    WHAT DOES SOUNDWEAVER DO?

    • SoundWeaver automates and randomizes certain parts of your sound design workflow.
    • SoundWeaver searches your sound library with the help of keywords or folder paths and picks matching sounds for your project.
    • Sounds are automatically sorted, grouped, layered, aligned and split into regions (if files contain multiple variations).
    • Now you can pitch, offset, gain, shuffle and randomize individual sounds, groups or the whole project. The possibilities are endless.
    • Take snapshots of your favorite combinations and settings. Create as many variants as you like and return to them later in the process.
    • Drag’n’drop the project into your DAW for further editing or export the final mix.
    • SoundWeaver can generate countless variations from your project during export via pitch, offset and take randomization.


    HOW SOUNDWEAVER HELPS YOUR WORKFLOW

    MORE VARIETY ON TIGHT SCHEDULES
    We all know the situation: A client has asked for 100 new sound assets, 10 variations each, delivered as soon as possible.
    Creating variations in particular requires a lot of meticulous pitching, shifting and switching out elements within your original design.
    With just a few commands, SoundWeaver will automate all of those time-consuming steps for you and generate as many suggestions as you like – so all that’s left for you to do is have a quick listen and keep the ones you like best.
    Focus on your creative process while SoundWeaver takes care of the rest.

    INSPIRATION THROUGH NEW COMBINATIONS
    Speaking of creative process: Once your library has grown beyond a certain point, there is only so much experimenting you can do manually. SoundWeaver’s powerful Randomize feature often generates combinations we’d never think of trying in the first place.
    This opens up a world of new possibilities and is a great way of starting a project.
    Already have an idea? Tell SoundWeaver to build on it and create different flavors.
    Starting empty-handed? Let SoundWeaver set up your session by putting all layers in place.
    Done, but missing that special something? Try out more unlikely sounds with just a few clicks.


    SOUNDWEAVER At A Glance

    KEY FEATURES

    • SoundWeaver automatically picks, slices, aligns and layers sounds
    • Search by keywords, folders or drag’n’drop
    • Pitch, offset, gain, shuffle and switch out individual sounds, groups or the whole project
    • Each of the previous parameters can be randomized.
    • Export: Drag’n’drop the project into your DAW
    • Export as: Individual layers, groups or mixdown
    • Export features: Generate variations using pitch, offset or random takes
    • Take snapshots and return to your favorite combinations, parameter settings and sounds at will

    TECH SPECS

    Format: Standalone Application for Windows & Mac
    Required Hard Disk Space: 30 MB
    Manual: PDF
    License Agreement: PDF
    Available As: Download

    REQUIREMENTS

    SOFTWARE
    SoundWeaver is a standalone application and works without any host audio software.

    SYSTEM
    Windows 7 (64-bit), 8 GB Ram, Intel® Core i5
    Mac OS X 10.9, 8 GB Ram, Intel® Core i5

    ILOK
    SoundWeaver requires a free iLok account

    Available licensing options:
    Machine License activation and USB Dongle (iLok 2 or higher)

    20 %
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  • City Life Buenos Aires Ambiences Play Track 71 sounds included, 200 mins total $39.99

    Buenos Aires Ambiences features 71 beautifully and professionally recorded ambient sounds of downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina, with their rich and unique Spanish dialect, a variety of perspectives, locations, and times of day, everything is categorized with metadata input via Basehead Ultra, and mastered in Protools HD.  We originally recorded over 80gb of data which translated to 42 hours and meticulously cut it down to 6.5gb/3 hours and 20 min of the best and most useful ambiences.

    Included is: City airs, botanical gardens, parks, markets, cemetery, city plazas and squares, nature reserve, busy and quiet streets, traffic, crowds, early morning bird chorus, evening airs, construction, airport, department stores, cafes, restaurants, library, church and cathedral, train station, public transit, museum, roomtones, rain.  And a variety of each, with different perspectives and amounts of walla and voices.

    Thank you and we hope you enjoy our recordings

    Buenos Aires Ambiences includes 3 hours of beautiful ambiences of downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a massive variety of locations and times of day, this album will not dissapoint!

    Add to cart
  • The Siemens Valero is a high-speed train that is an engineering marvel and a staple of modern high-grade national and transcontinental rail transport, with various versions zipping across the UK, the EU, Russia, and the far reaches of Asia including China. This is a train capable of 290 kilometres per hour (180 mph), it is the high-speed joiner of distant cities such as Moscow and Saint Petersburg. For our recording project, we captured it across a comprehensive range of its speeds. Sennheiser Ambeo microphones were used throughout.

    Recordings were made inside carriages, inside a compartment, down gangways, across the ever-dramatic space connecting railcar vestibules, and also less glorified but vital locations, e.g., the loo. All relevant background sounds are there, including door movements, passenger chatter, objects in motion, and the sounds of the restaurant car. For the characteristic sounds of a great ‘iron horse’, inside and out, this is it. Flysound… Putting the ‘track’ into soundtrack!

    Add to cart
  • Environments Mauritius Play Track 75 sounds included, 260 mins total $30 $22.50

    Country, town and city ambiences from the beautiful Island of Mauritius, situated in the Indian Ocean to the east of Africa. The pack covers a range from town and city traffic and restaurant and market crowds to calm ocean waves and the native birds, insects and other wildlife that can be found on the island.

    Please note: Some of the recordings were made at 44.1k and some at 96k. They have all been resampled to 48k for the download but the 96k recordings are also available as a separate download.

    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1582412399
    Add to cart
  • Environments Spring Waterfalls Play Track 17 sounds included, 83 mins total $15 $10

    Several waterfalls and rivers recorded in the Vosges Mountains in France.
    It tooks place in three different location: Cascade Charlemagne, Pont des Fées, Saut des Cuves.
    For almost every place, several microphones placements were used at close, medium and far distance.
    In addition to the 2 stereo microphone pairs, a hydrophone track is also available to allow you to modulate the low end and to add more movement.

    Gear used:
    Sound Devices 788T
    MKH8020 stereo pair
    MKH8040 stereo pair
    JRF hydrophone
    33 %
    OFF
    Ends 1580252399
    Add to cart


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Thanks to everyone who set up the GDC ’18 Game Audio Mentoring, I along with many others, had the ability to meet with a veteran in game audio who donated their time at GDC for newer members to ask them questions. During lunch, I was able to meet with Adam Gubman of MoonWalk Audio to discuss topics such as branding, balancing multiple interests as a freelancer, and the importance of knowing oneself outside of their career.

After that insightful talk I jumped right back into the Bootcamp with Reel Talk talking about…well, reels! Matthew Marteinsson of Klei Entertainment and Kevin Regamey of Power Up Audio gave a hilarious yet insightful look into how and how not to make an appealing reel and website. Some specific takeaways: Label what you’ve done, showing some implementation work is now the standard, and make sure you’re spelling implementation correctly. After this talk was “Talking about Talking: Recording and Producing Well Crafted Dialogue” by Amanda Rose Smith. I’ve been doing increasingly more dialogue editorial so I was interested in hearing someone who’s involved in the whole dialogue pipeline. From file labeling techniques to warning us about the dangers of relying too much on LUFS (loudness units relative to full scale) in dialogue mastering, Smith gave a very concise talk about the recording and editorial process. This was the last presentation I was able to attend on Tuesday, since I had to prepare to table for a few games I worked on at the IDGA mixer. A frequent collaborator of mine, River Liu, was an IDGA scholar. Since we first met two Global Game Jams ago, I’ve always answered her call for more music and sound in her games. It was a fun event that focused on interacting with others, rather than loud music in dark places. I then headed over to the Game Audio Denizen Facebook group California Pizza Kitchen dinner, coordinated by the fabulous DB Cooper. After ending the night with Denny’s, it was time to call it night.

An 8-bit stylized map shows that attendees have traveled from around the world.

WEDNESDAY

One of my busiest days by far was Wednesday. I was able to attend part of the “What’s Next? A Game Audio MicroTalk Series”, a collection of ten short talks about varying experiences in the industry. Unfortunately, I had to leave for a meeting. I was actually able to attend GDC on a Conference and Summit pass thanks to XBox’s Jerry Lawson Grant for Career Development. Part of that grant included meeting other grant winners and members of the XBox team. I then went to the expo floor for a few minutes before it was time for the first day of CarouselCon! Organized by Matthew Marteinsson during lunch behind the Carousel, there are two mini-talks and then the floor is opened to anybody that wishes to talk. It’s a great time to learn about other points of view and maximize our learning during GDC.

The rest of the day was meetings until I attended the XBox Blacks in Gaming mixer. It’s important to build a community that fosters diversity in the game industry as well as spaces that allow those underrepresented to discuss successes and common problems. Following the BiG mixer, I went to the Unity Party. While incredibly impressive, it was also incredibly loud. I found that some of the most meaningful talks that I had there was outside the venue. With all of the parties and events happening, it can be difficult to remember that bigger and louder doesn’t always equal better.

THURSDAY

Thursday was an especially action-packed day for the game audio community. On top of the G.A.N.G (Game Audio Network Guild) Awards, an award show in which members of the community vote for the music, sound, and articles in game audio, A Shell in the Pit coordinated the second annual Game Audio Karaoke! But I’m getting ahead of myself. Thursday was another day on the expo floor for me. One of the first booths that I attended was Wwise’s. With the announcement of the Wwise 251 certification and the Wwise Adventure Game, there was quite a bit to learn about.

This year I was given the opportunity to volunteer at the G.A.N.G Awards. I wanted to be able to somehow give back to the community that offers so much, so I jumped at the chance to make the officers jobs a little easier. If you saw two people running up to Becky Allen and Bonnie Bogovich before the winners were announced and then scurrying away, then you probably caught a peak of me and Emily Pitts, a student at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music (my alma mater). A highlight of the night was when Bonny and Becky lead the audience in arpeggiating on the word GANG, lead by a kazoo. The standout winner was Will Roget, the composer of Call of Duty, who won 5 awards.

I had already lost my voice twice in two weeks, so I decided to opt out of karaoke and just mingle with others who stayed after the show.

FRIDAY

People sit around the Day of the Devs boothFriday was a bit more subdued compared to the last few days. Much of the same happened. Sightglass in the morning, CarouselCon in the afternoon. I chose to spend most of the day walking the expo floor, since it closed at 3PM. I spent quite a bit of time at the Day of the Devs showcase. Some games that really stood out to me were Harold Handibut: A Handmade Adventure Tale by Slow Games, Mosaic by Krillbite Studio, Knights and Bikes by Foam Sword, and Dead Static Drive by Team Fanclub. Friday night was the School of Video Game Audio meetup at the California Pizza Kitchen. With the convention fading away, it was a night of goodbyes.

SATURDAY MORNING

While everyone else was sleeping in or catching flights, members of the audio community dutifully met up at Sightglass Coffee one more time to reflect upon the week and set goals for the year ahead. This was a bit different than the past few days though. We expanded the conversation to topics such as unionization, inclusivity, privilege, and how we as a community can always do better to respect each other. While it’s easy to talk about how everything is fantastic and ride the GDC high, it’s sobering to remember that there’s always room for improvement and acknowledge toxic elements that still persevere. To quote Damian Kastbauer himself from a must-read Twitter chain: “We need each other to foster an environment of continuous improvement in order to change the culture. It is bigger than #GameAudio but it’s where we live and can affect change.”

We have a habit of marking our development as human beings with large, annual events: Birthdays, Holidays, and for those fortunate enough to attend consecutive years, GDC. The ability to honestly reflect upon growth while surrounded by colleagues and friends is a special thing that I try not to take for granted. Though GDC may be over and I’m drowning in business cards, I think I can officially call my second GDC a success as I prepare to make my third one even better.

The busy entrance of the Moscone Center North Hall.

 

A big thanks to Colin Andrew Grant for sharing his insights and experiences from GDC! We hope to see you there next year!

 

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  • British Stately Home is a collaboration between two award-winning sound designers, Stefan Henrix (Chernobyl, Batman Begins) and Steve Fanagan (Room, Frank). It is a collection of 256 files recorded at 24bit/96kHz, totalling 18.6GB. The recordings are a mixture of mono, stereo, LCR and 5.0 files. In some cases there are multiple perspectives on the same recording (close, mid and wide). There are also Impulse Responses from several of the building's more characterfully reverberant rooms, which have been recorded from different perspectives and edited for use with Altiverb.

    Sounds for this library were recorded over two days in a beautifully maintained rural British Stately Home; a late-18th-century neo-classical mansion. We set out to record any and all aspects of the building and its surroundings. The collection includes doors, windows, fireplaces, clocks, drips, keys and various unusual, period specific props we came across.

    The interior of the building was one of the quietest places either of us have ever recorded and the Roomtones we've captured here are some of the most still and neutral recordings we've both made.

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    We often set-up with multiple mics to capture different perspectives of the same recordings and these will hopefully offer the user interesting options as they work with these sounds.

    At times we have left our own movements at the beginning and end of recordings, as they captured something of the building's unique acoustic and have proven useful to both of us in our own film work with this library. This is a diverse and versatile library and the recordings take well to pitch and time shifting, and to other plugin manipulation.

    Equipment Used: Sanken CMS-7S, DPA4060, Sennheiser MKH60, Rode NT4, Sound Devices 702T, Sound Devices USB Pre-2, Roland R26

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  • Trains Wooden Roller Coaster Play Track 50+ sounds included, 125 mins total $111

    This is a sfx library of a classic wooden roller coaster built in 1932 that is in operation at Bakken theme park in Klampenborg, Denmark. It was recorded in 5 takes with four onboard microphones, multiple stereo rigs placed around the track and a 4 channel sps200 ambeo microphone placed in the middle of the coaster for the first two takes, above the cart in the station for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th takes, and the last take underneath the photobooth hill next to the station.

    Sounds included are hill pass-bys, climbing, large bank turn, driving through tunnel, onboard sounds, and 4 channel atmos recording.

    This is a great library for designing trains, subways, future machines, and of course, roller coasters. All are recordings contain no park patrons while the park was closed. On one or two of the recordings (while the cart is off mic ) has some light construction noise from park cleaners, this does not affect the usable and editable coaster sounds. I have included a few cut plane by’s and atmospheres that were picked up in-between takes.

    If you are curious if a certain sound will work for you please send me a message at peterseeba@gmail.com

    Wooden Roller Coaster was recorded with Sound Devices 788, Mixpre3, Zoom H4,H5,H6 with a variety of microphones from DPA, Sennheiser, Line Audio, Soundfield and with wind protection from Bubblebee Industries, Rycote and Cinela.

    Add to cart
  • Destruction & Impact Bullet Impacts Play Track 320 sounds included $35

    Prepare for impact! This EFX Bullet Impact collection features a huge number of impacts into cars, metal, walls, water, body impacts, as well as passbys, ricochets and underwater passbys.

    A must-have for for actual bullet and combat sounds – and for adding oomph to many other types of impact sounds too!

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Explore the full, unique collection here

Latest sound effects libraries:
 
  • AUDIO LAYERING WIZARD


    SoundWeaver helps you design new sounds from existing audio material in less time.

    CREATE MORESKIP THE BUSYWORK

    USE CASES

    • Produce more assets and increase productivity on tight schedules
    • Set up your sound design session with ready-to-use sound combinations
    • Generate variations with ease instead of manually tweaking everything
    • Find new combinations, discover and create new flavors and variety within your library

    WHAT DOES SOUNDWEAVER DO?

    • SoundWeaver automates and randomizes certain parts of your sound design workflow.
    • SoundWeaver searches your sound library with the help of keywords or folder paths and picks matching sounds for your project.
    • Sounds are automatically sorted, grouped, layered, aligned and split into regions (if files contain multiple variations).
    • Now you can pitch, offset, gain, shuffle and randomize individual sounds, groups or the whole project. The possibilities are endless.
    • Take snapshots of your favorite combinations and settings. Create as many variants as you like and return to them later in the process.
    • Drag’n’drop the project into your DAW for further editing or export the final mix.
    • SoundWeaver can generate countless variations from your project during export via pitch, offset and take randomization.


    HOW SOUNDWEAVER HELPS YOUR WORKFLOW

    MORE VARIETY ON TIGHT SCHEDULES
    We all know the situation: A client has asked for 100 new sound assets, 10 variations each, delivered as soon as possible.
    Creating variations in particular requires a lot of meticulous pitching, shifting and switching out elements within your original design.
    With just a few commands, SoundWeaver will automate all of those time-consuming steps for you and generate as many suggestions as you like – so all that’s left for you to do is have a quick listen and keep the ones you like best.
    Focus on your creative process while SoundWeaver takes care of the rest.

    INSPIRATION THROUGH NEW COMBINATIONS
    Speaking of creative process: Once your library has grown beyond a certain point, there is only so much experimenting you can do manually. SoundWeaver’s powerful Randomize feature often generates combinations we’d never think of trying in the first place.
    This opens up a world of new possibilities and is a great way of starting a project.
    Already have an idea? Tell SoundWeaver to build on it and create different flavors.
    Starting empty-handed? Let SoundWeaver set up your session by putting all layers in place.
    Done, but missing that special something? Try out more unlikely sounds with just a few clicks.


    SOUNDWEAVER At A Glance

    KEY FEATURES

    • SoundWeaver automatically picks, slices, aligns and layers sounds
    • Search by keywords, folders or drag’n’drop
    • Pitch, offset, gain, shuffle and switch out individual sounds, groups or the whole project
    • Each of the previous parameters can be randomized.
    • Export: Drag’n’drop the project into your DAW
    • Export as: Individual layers, groups or mixdown
    • Export features: Generate variations using pitch, offset or random takes
    • Take snapshots and return to your favorite combinations, parameter settings and sounds at will

    TECH SPECS

    Format: Standalone Application for Windows & Mac
    Required Hard Disk Space: 30 MB
    Manual: PDF
    License Agreement: PDF
    Available As: Download

    REQUIREMENTS

    SOFTWARE
    SoundWeaver is a standalone application and works without any host audio software.

    SYSTEM
    Windows 7 (64-bit), 8 GB Ram, Intel® Core i5
    Mac OS X 10.9, 8 GB Ram, Intel® Core i5

    ILOK
    SoundWeaver requires a free iLok account

    Available licensing options:
    Machine License activation and USB Dongle (iLok 2 or higher)

    20 %
    OFF
    Ends 1581116399
  • City Life Buenos Aires Ambiences Play Track 71 sounds included, 200 mins total $39.99

    Buenos Aires Ambiences features 71 beautifully and professionally recorded ambient sounds of downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina, with their rich and unique Spanish dialect, a variety of perspectives, locations, and times of day, everything is categorized with metadata input via Basehead Ultra, and mastered in Protools HD.  We originally recorded over 80gb of data which translated to 42 hours and meticulously cut it down to 6.5gb/3 hours and 20 min of the best and most useful ambiences.

    Included is: City airs, botanical gardens, parks, markets, cemetery, city plazas and squares, nature reserve, busy and quiet streets, traffic, crowds, early morning bird chorus, evening airs, construction, airport, department stores, cafes, restaurants, library, church and cathedral, train station, public transit, museum, roomtones, rain.  And a variety of each, with different perspectives and amounts of walla and voices.

    Thank you and we hope you enjoy our recordings

    Buenos Aires Ambiences includes 3 hours of beautiful ambiences of downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a massive variety of locations and times of day, this album will not dissapoint!

  • The Siemens Valero is a high-speed train that is an engineering marvel and a staple of modern high-grade national and transcontinental rail transport, with various versions zipping across the UK, the EU, Russia, and the far reaches of Asia including China. This is a train capable of 290 kilometres per hour (180 mph), it is the high-speed joiner of distant cities such as Moscow and Saint Petersburg. For our recording project, we captured it across a comprehensive range of its speeds. Sennheiser Ambeo microphones were used throughout.

    Recordings were made inside carriages, inside a compartment, down gangways, across the ever-dramatic space connecting railcar vestibules, and also less glorified but vital locations, e.g., the loo. All relevant background sounds are there, including door movements, passenger chatter, objects in motion, and the sounds of the restaurant car. For the characteristic sounds of a great ‘iron horse’, inside and out, this is it. Flysound… Putting the ‘track’ into soundtrack!

  • Environments Mauritius Play Track 75 sounds included, 260 mins total $30 $22.50

    Country, town and city ambiences from the beautiful Island of Mauritius, situated in the Indian Ocean to the east of Africa. The pack covers a range from town and city traffic and restaurant and market crowds to calm ocean waves and the native birds, insects and other wildlife that can be found on the island.

    Please note: Some of the recordings were made at 44.1k and some at 96k. They have all been resampled to 48k for the download but the 96k recordings are also available as a separate download.

    25 %
    OFF
    Ends 1582412399
  • Environments Spring Waterfalls Play Track 17 sounds included, 83 mins total $15 $10

    Several waterfalls and rivers recorded in the Vosges Mountains in France.
    It tooks place in three different location: Cascade Charlemagne, Pont des Fées, Saut des Cuves.
    For almost every place, several microphones placements were used at close, medium and far distance.
    In addition to the 2 stereo microphone pairs, a hydrophone track is also available to allow you to modulate the low end and to add more movement.

    Gear used:
    Sound Devices 788T
    MKH8020 stereo pair
    MKH8040 stereo pair
    JRF hydrophone
    33 %
    OFF
    Ends 1580252399
 
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